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Is Recipiency of Disability Pension Hereditary?

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This paper addresses whether children’s exposure to parents receiving disability benefits induces a higher probability of receiving such benefits themselves. Most OECD countries experience an increasing proportion of the working-age population receiving permanent disability benefits. Using data from Norway, a country where around 10% of the working-age population rely on disability benefits, we find that the amount of time that children are exposed to their fathers receiving disability benefits affects their own likelihood of receiving benefits positively. This finding is robust to a range of different specifications, including family fixed effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Bratberg, Espen & Nilsen, Øivind Anti & Vaage, Kjell, 2012. "Is Recipiency of Disability Pension Hereditary?," Working Papers in Economics 07/12, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:bergec:2012_007
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Disability; intergenerational correlations; siblings fixed effects;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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