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Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in Norway: Levels and Trends

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Listed:
  • Espen Bratberg
  • Øivind Anti Nilsen
  • Kjell Vaage

Abstract

Using longitudinal data for Norwegian children born in 1950, 1955, 1960 and 1965, we find a relatively high degree of earnings mobility. There is no tendency toward decreasing mobility over the cohorts. Conditioning on the position in the earnings distribution, the analysis indicates quite high mobility in the middle of the distribution and somewhat more persistence at the top and bottom. This approach also reveals increased mobility over time for sons, but a less clear picture for daughters.

Suggested Citation

  • Espen Bratberg & Øivind Anti Nilsen & Kjell Vaage, 2005. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in Norway: Levels and Trends," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 107(3), pages 419-435, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scandj:v:107:y:2005:i:3:p:419-435
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9442.2005.00416.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Aakvik, Arild & Salvanes, Kjell G. & Vaage, Kjell, 2003. "Measuring Heterogeneity in the Returns to Education in Norway Using Educational Reforms," IZA Discussion Papers 815, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Oddbjørn Raaum & Kjell G. Salvanes & Erik O. Sørensen, 2006. "The Neighbourhood is Not What it Used to be," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(508), pages 200-222, January.
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