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Multi-Trait Matching and Intergenerational Mobility: A Cinderella Story

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  • Chen, Natalie
  • Conconi, Paola
  • Perroni, Carlo

Abstract

Empirical studies of intergenerational social mobility have found that women are more mobile than men. To explain this finding, we describe a model of multi-trait matching and inheritance, in which individuals’ attractiveness in the marriage market depends on their market and non-market characteristics. We show that the observed gender differences in social mobility can arise if market characteristics are relatively more important in determining marriage outcomes for men than for women and are more persistent across generations than non-market characteristics. Paradoxically, the female advantage in social mobility may be due to their adverse treatment in the labor market. A reduction in gender discrimination in the labor market leads to an increase in homogamy in the marriage market, lowering social mobility for both genders.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Natalie & Conconi, Paola & Perroni, Carlo, 2011. "Multi-Trait Matching and Intergenerational Mobility: A Cinderella Story," CEPR Discussion Papers 8605, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:8605
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    Cited by:

    1. Julia Schwenkenberg, 2013. "Selection into Occupations and the Intergenerational Socioeconomic Mobility of Daughters and Sons," Working Papers Rutgers University, Newark 2013-006, Department of Economics, Rutgers University, Newark.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender Earnings Gap; Inheritance; Matching; Social Mobility;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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