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Siblings and Educational Attainment in West Germany

  • Blaess, Virginie
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    Individual decisions on education are still an important topic in social sciences research. Our goal is an analysis of the impact of siblings on educational attainment in West Germany. Theories of educational decisions in a family context suggest several possible effects of siblings. During the 1990s, several authors analyzed this relationship for the United States and came up with contradictory results on the relative importance of different factors. Consequently, an empirical analysis is required, which is provided in this paper based on data from the GSOEP. In order to control for unobservable heterogeneity in educational decisions, several empirical specifications including propensity score matching are tested. The results suggest that boys are favored by their parents relative to girls. Furthermore, the gender of their siblings shows no significant impact on the educational attainment of boys, while a significant effect is found for girls. Finally, the educational attainment of an elder sibling shows a significant and positive effect on education decisions of the second child.

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    File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/23938/1/2005-001E.pdf
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    Paper provided by University of Erfurt, Faculty of Economics, Law and Social Sciences in its series Discussion Papers with number 2005,001E.

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    Date of creation: 2005
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    Handle: RePEc:zbw:erfdps:2005001e
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.uni-erfurt.de/staatswissenschaften/
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    1. Robert Kaestner, 1997. "Are Brothers Really Better? Sibling Sex Composition and Educational Achievement Revisited," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(2), pages 250-284.
    2. Orley Ashenfelter & David J. Zimmerman, 1997. "Estimates Of The Returns To Schooling From Sibling Data: Fathers, Sons, And Brothers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(1), pages 1-9, February.
    3. Butcher, Kristin F & Case, Anne, 1994. "The Effect of Sibling Sex Composition on Women's Education and Earnings," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(3), pages 531-63, August.
    4. Becker, Gary S & Tomes, Nigel, 1976. "Child Endowments and the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages S143-62, August.
    5. Bauer, Thomas K. & Gang, Ira N., 2000. "Sibling Rivalry in Educational Attainment: The German Case," IZA Discussion Papers 180, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Lorraine Dearden & Barbara Sianesi, 2001. "Estimating the Returns to Education: Models, Methods and Results," CEE Discussion Papers 0016, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    7. Gödde, Isabel & Schnabel, Reinhold, 1998. "Does Family Background Matter? - Returns to Education and Family Characteristics in Germany," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 98-60, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim;Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
    8. Richard Blundell & Lorraine Dearden & Barbara Sianesi, 2004. "Evaluating the Impact of Education on Earnings in the UK: Models, Methods and Results from the NCDS," CEE Discussion Papers 0047, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    9. Heckman, James J & Ichimura, Hidehiko & Todd, Petra, 1998. "Matching as an Econometric Evaluation Estimator," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(2), pages 261-94, April.
    10. Lindahl, Lena, 2002. "Do birth order and family size matter for intergenerational income mobility? Evidence from Sweden," Working Paper Series 5/2002, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    11. repec:ese:iserwp:2001-12 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Nathan D. Grawe & Casey B. Mulligan, 2002. "Economic Interpretations of Intergenerational Correlations," NBER Working Papers 8948, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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