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Beyond lectures and tutorials: Formal on-the-job training received by young European university graduates

  • Salas-Velasco, Manuel

This paper examines the probability of receiving job-related formal training and the returns to on-the-job training in Europe using a sample containing personal, educational, and firm characteristics. The results show that certain occupations, such as managers and professionals, receive more training than others. Furthermore, certain types of workers are more likely to receive training--for example, those graduates in the public sector and those working in larger firms. With respect to the returns to training, estimation results show that the training measure has a significant impact on wages. In estimating the returns to training we have also taken into account the fact that participation in training is endogenous and not random.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Research in Economics.

Volume (Year): 63 (2009)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 200-211

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Handle: RePEc:eee:reecon:v:63:y:2009:i:3:p:200-211
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622941

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