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Wage effects of on-the-job training; a meta-analysis

  • Haelermans Carla
  • Borghans Lex


A meta-analysis is used to study the average wage effects of on-the-job training. This study showsthat the average reported wage effect of on-the-job training, corrected for publication bias, is2.6 per cent per course. The analyses reveal a substantial heterogeneity between training courses,while wage effects reported in studies based on instrumental variables and panel estimators aresubstantially lower than estimates based on techniques that do not correct for selectivity issues.Appropriate methodology and the quality of the data turn out to be crucial to determine the wagereturns.

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Paper provided by Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR) in its series Research Memorandum with number 054.

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Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:unm:umamet:2011054
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