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Performance Pay, Training and Labor Mobility

  • Gielen, Anne C.

    ()

    (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

Market imperfections may cause firms and workers to under-invest in specific training. This paper shows that profit sharing may be a suitable instrument to enhance specific training investments, either by enhancing wage flexibility or by increasing the returns to training. As a result, profit sharing not only increases productivity by means of an effort effect, but also by increased training investments. Furthermore, the results suggest that older workers' employability can be improved if a profit-related remuneration is paid.

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File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp2932.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 2932.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp2932
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  1. Lynch, Lisa M, 1992. "Private-Sector Training and the Earnings of Young Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 299-312, March.
  2. Gielen, Anne & Kerkhofs, Marcel J M & van Ours, Jan C, 2006. "Performance Related Pay and Labour Productivity," CEPR Discussion Papers 5455, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Daron Acemoglu & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 1998. "Why Do Firms Train? Theory And Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 113(1), pages 78-118, February.
  4. Cahuc, P. & Dormont, B., 1992. "Profit-Sharing: Does It Increase Productivity and Employment? A Theoretical Model and Empirical Evidence of French Micro Data," Papiers d'Economie Mathématique et Applications 92.45, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
  5. Arulampalam, Wiji & Booth, Alison L. & Bryan, Mark L., 2003. "Training in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 933, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Mark A. Loewenstein & James R. Spletzer, 1999. "General and Specific Training: Evidence and Implications," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(4), pages 710-733.
  7. G. S. Maddala & Lung-Fei Lee, 1976. "Recursive Models with Qualitative Endogenous Variables," NBER Chapters, in: Annals of Economic and Social Measurement, Volume 5, number 4, pages 525-545 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Ewing, Bradley T., 1996. "Wages and performance-based pay: Evidence from the NLSY," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 241-246, May.
  9. Parent, Daniel, 2004. "Incentives? The effect of profit sharing plans offered by previous employers on current wages," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 37-42, April.
  10. Lorraine Dearden & Howard Reed & John Van Reenen, 2005. "The impact of training on productivity and wages: evidence from British panel data," IFS Working Papers W05/16, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  11. Gielen, A. C. & van Ours, J.C., 2006. "Why do Worker-Firm Matches Dissolve?," Discussion Paper 2006-57, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  12. Gielen, A. C. & van Ours, J.C., 2005. "Age-specific Cyclical Effects in Job Reallocation and Labor Mobility," Discussion Paper 2005-86, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  13. repec:dgr:kubcen:20061 is not listed on IDEAS
  14. Mark A. Loewenstein & James R. Spletzer, 1997. "Delayed formal on-the-job training," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 51(1), pages 82-99, October.
  15. Edwin Leuven, 2005. "The Economics of Private Sector Training: A Survey of the Literature," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(1), pages 91-111, 02.
  16. Parent, Daniel, 1999. "Wages and Mobility: The Impact of Employer-Provided Training," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(2), pages 298-317, April.
  17. Alison L. Booth & Mark L. Bryan, 2005. "Testing Some Predictions of Human Capital Theory: New Training Evidence from Britain," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(2), pages 391-394, May.
  18. Stevens, Margaret, 1994. "A Theoretical Model of On-the-Job Training with Imperfect Competition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(4), pages 537-62, October.
  19. Loewenstein, Mark A & Spletzer, James R, 1998. "Dividing the Costs and Returns to General Training," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 142-71, January.
  20. Omar Azfar & Stephan Danninger, 2001. "Profit sharing, employment stability, and wage growth," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(3), pages 619-630, April.
  21. Booth, Alison L & Frank, Jeff, 1999. "Earnings, Productivity, and Performance-Related Pay," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(3), pages 447-63, July.
  22. Harley Frazis & Mark A. Loewenstein, 2005. "Reexamining the Returns to Training: Functional Form, Magnitude, and Interpretation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(2).
  23. Canice Prendergast, 1999. "The Provision of Incentives in Firms," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 7-63, March.
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