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Wage Effects of On-the-Job Training: A Meta-Analysis


  • Haelermans, Carla

    () (Maastricht University)

  • Borghans, Lex

    () (Maastricht University)


A meta-analysis is used to study the average wage effects of on-the-job training. This study shows that the average reported wage effect of on-the-job training, corrected for publication bias, is 2.6 per cent per course. The analyses reveal a substantial heterogeneity between training courses, while wage effects reported in studies based on instrumental variables and panel estimators are substantially lower than estimates based on techniques that do not correct for selectivity issues. Appropriate methodology and the quality of the data turn out to be crucial to determine the wage returns.

Suggested Citation

  • Haelermans, Carla & Borghans, Lex, 2011. "Wage Effects of On-the-Job Training: A Meta-Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 6077, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6077

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:jknowl:v:8:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s13132-015-0309-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Adriaan Zon & Roberto Antonietti, 2016. "Education and training in a model of endogenous growth with creative wear-and-tear," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 33(1), pages 35-62, April.
    3. Nazila Alinaghi & W. Robert Reed, 2016. "Meta-Analysis and Publication Bias: How Well Does the FAT-PET-PEESE Procedure Work?," Working Papers in Economics 16/26, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    4. Mellander, Erik, 2014. "Transparency of human resource policy," Working Paper Series 2014:24, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    5. Rita Almeida & Marta Faria, 2014. "The wage returns to on-the-job training: evidence from matched employer-employee data," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-33, December.
    6. Hidalgo, Diana & Oosterbeek, Hessel & Webbink, Dinand, 2014. "The impact of training vouchers on low-skilled workers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 117-128.
    7. Nicola Brandt, 2015. "Vocational training and adult learning for better skills in France," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1260, OECD Publishing.
    8. Verónica Alaimo & Mariano Bosch & David S. Kaplan & Carmen Pagés & Laura Ripani, 2015. "Jobs for Growth," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 90977, February.
    9. Dauth, Christine, 2017. "Regional discontinuities and the effectiveness of further training subsidies for low-skilled employees," IAB Discussion Paper 201707, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    10. Benedikte Bjerge & Nina Torm & Neda Trifkovic, 2016. "Gender matters: Private sector training in Vietnamese SMEs," WIDER Working Paper Series 149, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    11. Dostie, Benoit & Javdani, Mohsen, 2017. "Not for the Profit, but for the Training? Gender Differences in Training in the For-Profit and Non-Profit Sectors," IZA Discussion Papers 11108, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Jarle Møen & Helge Sandvig Thorsen, 2017. "Publication Bias in the Returns to R&D Literature," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 8(3), pages 987-1013, September.
    13. Caliendo, Marco & Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Seitz, Helke & Uhlendorff, Arne, 2016. "Locus of Control and Investment in Training," IZA Discussion Papers 10406, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    15. Christiane Hinerasky & Rene Fahr & Sabine Simons, 2014. "Wage Returns of Company Training - Evidence from a Comparison Group Approach," Working Papers Dissertations 17, Paderborn University, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics.
    16. repec:eee:ecmode:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:270-287 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Benoit Dostie, 2015. "Who benefits from firm-sponsored training?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 145-145, April.

    More about this item


    meta-analysis; on-the-job training; publication bias;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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