IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ucp/jlabec/v15y1997i3p507-28.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

How Well Do We Measure Training?

Author

Listed:
  • Barron, John M
  • Berger, Mark C
  • Black, Dan A

Abstract

This article compares various measures of on-the-job training, from a new source that matches establishments and workers, allowing the authors to compare the responses of employers and employees to identical training questions. Establishments report 25 percent more hours of training than do workers, although workers and establishments report similar incidence rates of training. Both establishment and worker measures agree that there is much more informal training than formal training. Further, informal training is measured about as accurately as formal training. Finally, the authors show that measurement error reduces substantially the observed effect of training, in particular the effect of training on productivity growth. Copyright 1997 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Barron, John M & Berger, Mark C & Black, Dan A, 1997. "How Well Do We Measure Training?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(3), pages 507-528, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:15:y:1997:i:3:p:507-28
    DOI: 10.1086/209870
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/209870
    File Function: full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers. See http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE for details.

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1086/209870?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Levine, David I, 1993. "Worth Waiting For? Delayed Compensation, Training, and Turnover in the United States and Japan," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(4), pages 724-752, October.
    2. Freeman, Richard B, 1984. "Longitudinal Analyses of the Effects of Trade Unions," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 2(1), pages 1-26, January.
    3. Joseph G. Altonji & James R. Spletzer, 1991. "Worker Characteristics, Job Characteristics, and the Receipt of On-the-Job Training," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 45(1), pages 58-79, October.
    4. Jacob Mincer, 1962. "On-the-Job Training: Costs, Returns, and Some Implications," NBER Chapters, in: Investment in Human Beings, pages 50-79, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Mellow, Wesley & Sider, Hal, 1983. "Accuracy of Response in Labor Market Surveys: Evidence and Implications," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(4), pages 331-344, October.
    6. Lynch, Lisa M, 1992. "Private-Sector Training and the Earnings of Young Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 299-312, March.
    7. Norman Bowers & Paul Swaim, 1994. "Recent Trends In Job Training," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 12(1), pages 79-88, January.
    8. Booth, Alison L, 1993. "Private Sector Training and Graduate Earnings," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 75(1), pages 164-170, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Parent, Daniel, 1999. "Wages and Mobility: The Impact of Employer-Provided Training," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(2), pages 298-317, April.
    2. Steven McIntosh, 1999. "A Cross-Country Comparison of the Determinants of Vocational Training," CEP Discussion Papers dp0432, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Salas-Velasco, Manuel, 2009. "Beyond lectures and tutorials: Formal on-the-job training received by young European university graduates," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 200-211, September.
    4. Cecilia ALBERT & Carlos GARCÍA-SERRANO & Virginia HERNANZ, 2010. "On-the-job training in Europe: Determinants and wage returns," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 149(3), pages 315-341, September.
    5. Giorgio Brunello & Maria De Paola, 2004. "Market Failures and the Under-Provision of Training," CESifo Working Paper Series 1286, CESifo.
    6. BLÁZQUEZ CUESTA, Maite & RAMOS RODRIGO, José, 2008. "Recent Investments in Human Capital and its Effect on the Chances of Escaping from Low-paid Jobs: The Spanish Case," Estudios de Economia Aplicada, Estudios de Economia Aplicada, vol. 26, pages 161-180, Agosto.
    7. John Gibson, 2003. "Do Lower Expected Wage Benefits Explain Ethnic Age Gaps in Job-Related Training? Evidence from New Zealand," Working Papers 03_03, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    8. John Gibson, 2003. "Do Lower Expected Wage Benefits Explain Ethnic Gaps In Job- Related Training? Evidence From New Zealand," Labor and Demography 0310004, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Hara, Hiromi, 2019. "The impact of worker-financed training: Evidence from early- and mid-career workers in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 64-75.
    10. Sieben, I.J.P., 2005. "Does training trigger turnover...or not? : the impact of formal training on young men's and women's job search behaviour," ROA Research Memorandum 6E, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    11. Adam J. Grossberg & Paul Sicilian, 1999. "Minimum Wages, On‐the‐Job Training, and Wage Growth," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 65(3), pages 539-556, January.
    12. Paul Sicilian & Adam Grossberg, 2001. "Investment in human capital and gender wage differences: evidence from the NLSY," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(4), pages 463-471.
    13. Yanick Labrie & Claude Montmarquette, 2005. "La formation qualifiante et transférable en milieu de travail," CIRANO Project Reports 2005rp-04, CIRANO.
    14. Laisney, François & Pohlmeier, Winfried & Staat, Matthias, 1991. "Estimation of labour supply functions using panel data: a survey," ZEW Discussion Papers 91-05, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    15. Patrick Lee O'Halloran, 2008. "Gender Differences in Formal On‐the‐Job Training: Incidence, Duration, and Intensity," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(4), pages 629-659, December.
    16. Mark C. Berger & John S. Earle & Klara Sabirianova, 2001. "Worker Training in a Restructuring Economy: Evidence from the Russian Transition," Book chapters authored by Upjohn Institute researchers, in: Soloman W. Polachek (ed.),Worker Wellbeing in a Changing Labor Market, pages 159-189, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    17. Christopher R. Bollinger, 2001. "Response Error and the Union Wage Differential," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 68(1), pages 60-76, July.
    18. Alan B. Krueger, 1988. "Are Public Sector Workers Paid More Than Their Alternative Wage? Evidence from Longitudinal Data and Job Queues," NBER Chapters, in: When Public Sector Workers Unionize, pages 217-242, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Bauer, Thomas K. & Haisken-DeNew, John P., 2001. "Employer learning and the returns to schooling," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 161-180, May.
    20. Pfeifer, Christian & Janssen, Simon & Yang, Philip & Backes-Gellner, Uschi, 2011. "Effects of Training on Employee Suggestions and Promotions in an Internal Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 5671, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:15:y:1997:i:3:p:507-28. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Journals Division (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.