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Wages and Mobility: The Impact of Employer-Provided Training

  • Parent, Daniel

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this article examines the impact of employer-provided training on the wage profile and on the mobility of young workers. The main results are that training with the current employer has a positive effect on the wage; employers seem to reward skills acquired through training with previous employers as much as skills they provide themselves; and part of the skills acquired though training programs provided by the current employer seem to be fairly specific as they are shown to reduce mobility, even after controlling for unobserved heterogeneity. Copyright 1999 by University of Chicago Press.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/209922
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Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 17 (1999)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 298-317

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:17:y:1999:i:2:p:298-317
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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  1. Brown, James N, 1989. "Why Do Wages Increase with Tenure? On-the-Job Training and Life-Cycle Wage Growth Observed within Firms," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(5), pages 971-91, December.
  2. Finnie, R., 1993. "Tenure Experience, and Men's and Women's Wages: Panel Estimates from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," Papers 9305, Laval - Recherche en Politique Economique.
  3. James L. Medoff & Katharine G. Abraham, 1980. "Experience, Performance, and Earnings," NBER Working Papers 0278, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. MacLeod, W Bentley & Malcomson, James M, 1993. "Investments, Holdup, and the Form of Market Contracts," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(4), pages 811-37, September.
  5. Barron, John M & Black, Dan A & Loewenstein, Mark A, 1989. "Job Matching and On-the-Job Training," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 7(1), pages 1-19, January.
  6. Robert H. Topel & Michael P. Ward, 1992. "Job Mobility and the Careers of Young Men," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 439-479.
  7. John M. Barron & Mark C. Berger & Dan A. Black, 1997. "On-the-Job Training," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number ojt, November.
  8. Lorne Carmichael, 1981. "Firm-Specific Human Capital and Promotion Ladders," Working Papers 452, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  9. MacLeod, W.B. & Malcomson, J.M., 1992. "Specific investment and wage profiles in labour markets," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 9228, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
  10. David G. Blanchflower & Lisa M. Lynch, 1994. "Training at Work: A Comparison of U.S. and British Youths," NBER Chapters, in: Training and the Private Sector: International Comparisons, pages 233-260 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Katharine G. Abraham & Henry S. Farber, 1986. "Job Duration, Seniority, and Earnings," NBER Working Papers 1819, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Joseph G. Altonji & James R. Spletzer, 1991. "Worker Characteristics, Job Characteristics, and the Receipt of On-the-Job Training," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 45(1), pages 58-79, October.
  13. Hashimoto, Masanori, 1981. "Firm-Specific Human Capital as a Shared Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 475-82, June.
  14. Jacob Mincer, 1988. "Job Training, Wage Growth, and Labor Turnover," NBER Working Papers 2690, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Kiefer, Nicholas M, 1988. "Economic Duration Data and Hazard Functions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 646-79, June.
  16. James L. Medoff & Katharine G. Abraham, 1981. "Are Those Paid More Really More Productive? The Case of Experience," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 16(2), pages 186-216.
  17. Lazear, Edward P, 1979. "Why Is There Mandatory Retirement?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(6), pages 1261-84, December.
  18. Chamberlain, Gary, 1982. "Multivariate regression models for panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 5-46, January.
  19. Joseph G. Altonji & Robert A. Shakotko, 1987. "Do Wages Rise with Job Seniority?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(3), pages 437-459.
  20. Lynch, Lisa M, 1992. "Private-Sector Training and the Earnings of Young Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 299-312, March.
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