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A cross-country comparison of the determinants of vocational training

  • Steven McIntosh

Using data from the European Labour Force Survey, the characteristics of individuals who receive vocational training is compared in six European countries; Germany, France, the Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden and the UK. As well as the incidence of training, the intensity is also considered. In addition, training is split into its on-the-job and off-the-job components. The spectrum of training within these six countries runs from Germany at one end, where most training is the intensive upskilling of young, unqualified workers, to Sweden at the other end, where the typical training spell is of short duration and is given to middle-aged, well-educated employees in professional jobs. Thus the pattern of training is largely determined by a country''s system of education. In Germany, vocational skills are not taught within the formal education sector, and are learned through participation on an apprenticeship scheme, while in Sweden, students do learn vocational skills at school, and so the workplace training we observe is mainly ''top-up'' courses.

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File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/20213/
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Paper provided by London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library in its series LSE Research Online Documents on Economics with number 20213.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: Aug 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:20213
Contact details of provider: Postal: LSE Library Portugal Street London, WC2A 2HD, U.K.
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Web page: http://www.lse.ac.uk/

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  1. Booth, Alison L, 1993. "Private Sector Training and Graduate Earnings," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 75(1), pages 164-70, February.
  2. Booth, Alison L & Satchell, Stephen E, 1994. "Apprenticeships and Job Tenure," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(4), pages 676-95, October.
  3. Greenhalgh, Christine & Stewart, Mark, 1982. "The effects and Determinants of Training," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 213, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  4. F Green & Stephen Machin & D Wilkinson, 1996. "Trade Unions and Training Practices in British Workplaces," CEP Discussion Papers dp0278, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  5. Stephen V. Cameron & James J. Heckman, 1993. "Determinants of Young Male Schooling and Training Choices," NBER Working Papers 4327, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Greenhalgh, Christine & Mavrotas, George, 1994. "The Role of Career Aspirations and Financial Constraints in Individual Access to Vocational Training," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(4), pages 579-604, October.
  7. Mark A. Loewenstein & James R. Spletzer, 1997. "Delayed formal on-the-job training," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 51(1), pages 82-99, October.
  8. Harley Frazis & Maury Gittleman & Mary Joyce, 2000. "Correlates of training: An analysis using both employer and employee characteristics," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 53(3), pages 443-462, April.
  9. Lynch, Lisa M, 1992. "Private-Sector Training and the Earnings of Young Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 299-312, March.
  10. Joseph G. Altonji & James R. Spletzer, 1991. "Worker Characteristics, Job Characteristics, and the Receipt of On-the-Job Training," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 45(1), pages 58-79, October.
  11. Arulampalam, Wiji & Booth, Alison L, 1996. "Who Gets Over the Training Hurdle? A Study of the Training Experiences of Young Men and Women in Britain," CEPR Discussion Papers 1470, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  12. Greenhalgh, Christine, 1999. "Adult Vocational Training and Government Policy in France and Britain," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(1), pages 97-113, Spring.
  13. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison L. Booth & Mark L. Bryan, 2004. "Training in Europe," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 2(2-3), pages 346-360, 04/05.
  14. Barron, John M & Fuess, Scott M, Jr & Loewenstein, Mark A, 1987. "Further Analysis of the Effect of Unions on Training [Union Wages, Temporary Layoffs, and Seniority]," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(3), pages 632-40, June.
  15. Green, Francis, 1993. "The Determinants of Training of Male and Female Employees in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 55(1), pages 103-22, February.
  16. Booth, Alison L, 1991. "Job-Related Formal Training: Who Receives It and What Is It Worth?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 53(3), pages 281-94, August.
  17. Rainer Winkelmann, 1997. "How young workers get their training: A survey of Germany versus the United States," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 159-170.
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