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Is There a Public Sector Training Advantage? Evidence from the Workplace Employment Relations Survey

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  • Philip Murphy
  • Paul L. Latreille
  • Melanie Jones
  • David Blackaby

Abstract

Using matched employer-employee data from the Workplace Employment Relations Survey (2004), we find a significant training 'advantage' exists for public sector workers over private sector workers even after accounting for differences in the composition of the two workforces. This finding is robust to all but one change in specification, designed to account for worker sorting effects which can lead to unobserved workplace-based effects being correlated with individual worker characteristics. Using the average characteristics of workers within an establishment as a control for these sorting effects all but eliminates the estimated public sector training advantage, which has otherwise been an empirical regularity of many individual-based training models. Copyright (c) Blackwell Publishing Ltd/London School of Economics 2008.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip Murphy & Paul L. Latreille & Melanie Jones & David Blackaby, 2008. "Is There a Public Sector Training Advantage? Evidence from the Workplace Employment Relations Survey," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 46(4), pages 674-701, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:46:y:2008:i:4:p:674-701
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Vinod Mishra & Russell Smyth, 2012. "High Performance Work Practices and Workplace Training in China: Evidence from Matched Employee-Employer Data," Monash Economics Working Papers 30-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    2. Didier Fouarge & Andries Grip & Wendy Smits & Robert Vries, 2012. "Flexible Contracts and Human Capital Investments," De Economist, Springer, vol. 160(2), pages 177-195, June.
    3. Francis Green & Alan Felstead & Duncan Gallie & Hande Inanc & Nick Jewson, 2016. "The Declining Volume of Workers’ Training in Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 54(2), pages 422-448, June.
    4. repec:eee:joecag:v:6:y:2015:i:c:p:163-175 is not listed on IDEAS

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