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High Performance Work Practices and Workplace Training in China: Evidence from Matched Employee-Employer Data


  • Vinod Mishra
  • Russell Smyth


This study examines the extent to which high performance work practices (HPWP) are correlated with participation in, and frequency and duration of, workplace training, controlling for worker and workplace characteristics. To do so, the study uses a unique matched employee-employer dataset from Shanghai. The findings suggest that about half of the HPWP considered are positively correlated with the incidence and breadth of workplace training. There is also some support for the view that bundling of HPWP is positively correlated with the provision of workplace training. There is, however, no evidence that the adoption of HPWP polarizes skills through resulting in more training for professional/technical staff over others.

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  • Vinod Mishra & Russell Smyth, 2012. "High Performance Work Practices and Workplace Training in China: Evidence from Matched Employee-Employer Data," Monash Economics Working Papers 30-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:2012-30

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    1. Oi, Walter Y, 1983. "Heterogeneous Firms and the Organization of Production," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(2), pages 147-171, April.
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    3. Adda & Dustmann, 2004. "Career Progression and Formal versus on the Job Training," Econometric Society 2004 North American Winter Meetings 492, Econometric Society.
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    5. Ng, Ying Chu, 2005. "Training determinants and productivity impact of training in China: a case of Shanghai," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 275-295, June.
    6. Lazear, Edward, 2003. "Firm-Specific Human Capital: A Skill-Weights Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 813, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Philip Murphy & Paul L. Latreille & Melanie Jones & David Blackaby, 2008. "Is There a Public Sector Training Advantage? Evidence from the Workplace Employment Relations Survey," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 46(4), pages 674-701, December.
    8. Kuan Xu & Zhengxi Lin, 2011. "Participation In Workplace Employer‐Sponsored Training In Canada: Role Of Firm Characteristics And Worker Attributes," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 29(3), pages 416-430, July.
    9. Edward P. Lazear, 2003. "Firm-Specific Human Capital: A Skill-Weights Approach," NBER Working Papers 9679, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Green, Francis, 1993. "The Determinants of Training of Male and Female Employees in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 55(1), pages 103-122, February.
    11. Mark A. Loewenstein & James R. Spletzer, 1999. "General and Specific Training: Evidence and Implications," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(4), pages 710-733.
    12. Booth, Alison L. & Bryan, Mark L., 2002. "Who Pays for General Training? New Evidence for British Men and Women," IZA Discussion Papers 486, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    China; Training; High performance work practices; Shanghai;

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