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Training determinants and productivity impact of training in China: a case of Shanghai

  • Ng, Ying Chu
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

    Volume (Year): 24 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 3 (June)
    Pages: 275-295

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:24:y:2005:i:3:p:275-295
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    1. John M. Barron & Mark C. Berger & Dan A. Black, 1997. "On-the-Job Training," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number ojt.
    2. Goux, Dominique & Maurin, Eric, 2000. "Returns to firm-provided training: evidence from French worker-firm matched data1," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 1-19, January.
    3. Wim Groot & Joop Hartog & Hessel Oosterbeek, 1994. "Returns to Within-Company Schooling of Employees: The Case of the Netherlands," NBER Chapters, in: Training and the Private Sector: International Comparisons, pages 299-308 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison L. Booth, 1997. "Who gets over the training hurdle? A study of the training experiences of young men and women in Britain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 197-217.
    5. Jonathan R. Veum, 1995. "Sources of training and their impact on wages," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(4), pages 812-826, July.
    6. Ann P. Bartel & Nachum Sicherman, 1995. "Technological Change and the Skill Acquisition of Young Workers," NBER Working Papers 5107, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Norman Bowers & Paul Swaim, 1994. "Recent Trends In Job Training," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 12(1), pages 79-88, 01.
    8. Booth, Alison L, 1991. "Job-Related Formal Training: Who Receives It and What Is It Worth?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 53(3), pages 281-94, August.
    9. Shields, Michael, 1998. "Changes in the Determinants of Employer-Funded Training for Full-Time Employees in Britain, 1984-1994," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 60(2), pages 189-214, May.
    10. Xin Meng & Junsen Zhang & Pak-Wai Liu, 2000. "Sectoral gender wage differentials and discrimination in the transitional Chinese economy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 331-352.
    11. Stevens, Margaret, 1994. "A Theoretical Model of On-the-Job Training with Imperfect Competition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(4), pages 537-62, October.
    12. Hill, Elizabeth T., 2001. "Post-school-age training among women: training methods and labor market outcomes at older ages," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 181-191, April.
    13. Booth, Alison L, 1993. "Private Sector Training and Graduate Earnings," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 75(1), pages 164-70, February.
    14. John Bishop, 1994. "The Impact of Previous Training on Productivity and Wages," NBER Chapters, in: Training and the Private Sector: International Comparisons, pages 161-200 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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