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Returns to firm-provided training: evidence from French worker-firm matched data1

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  • Goux, Dominique
  • Maurin, Eric

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  • Goux, Dominique & Maurin, Eric, 2000. "Returns to firm-provided training: evidence from French worker-firm matched data1," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 1-19, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:7:y:2000:i:1:p:1-19
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2001. "Continuous training in Germany," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(3), pages 523-548.
    2. David G. Blanchflower & Lisa M. Lynch, 1994. "Training at Work: A Comparison of U.S. and British Youths," NBER Chapters, in: Training and the Private Sector: International Comparisons, pages 233-260, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Lisa M. Lynch, 1994. "Training and the Private Sector: International Comparisons," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number lync94-1.
    4. Wim Groot & Joop Hartog & Hessel Oosterbeek, 1994. "Returns to Within-Company Schooling of Employees: The Case of the Netherlands," NBER Chapters, in: Training and the Private Sector: International Comparisons, pages 299-308, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Hocquet, L, 1997. "Vocational Training and the Poaching Externality : Evidence for France," Papers 12, Centre for Economic Performance & Institute of Economics.
    6. Lynch, Lisa M, 1992. "Private-Sector Training and the Earnings of Young Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 299-312, March.
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