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Work-Related Training and Wages: An empirical analysis for male workers in Switzerland

  • Michael Gerfin

Work-related training is considered to be very important for providing the workforce with the necessary skills for maintaining and enhancing the competitiveness of the firms and the economy. On the individual level, the primary effect of training should be an increased productivity of the trained workers. This paper provides estimates of the effects of training on wages which can be seen as a lower bound for the effects on productivity. Based on panel data from the Swiss Labour Force Survey (SLFS) I estimate these effects using nonparametric matching methods. Training is measured either as firm-sponsored training or as any work-related training. The data show that multiple participation in work-related training is not a rare event. This complicates the analysis considerably because the evaluation of dynamic treatments is not yet fully developed. As a solution to this problem a heuristic difference-in-differences approach to estimate the incremental effect of further training events is used. The results clearly indicate that it is important to account for multiple training events. Taken together, there are significant effects of work-related training on wages of roughly 2% for each training event. There is some evidence that workers who already have high earnings profit more from continuous work-related training

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Paper provided by Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft in its series Diskussionsschriften with number dp0316.

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Date of creation: Oct 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ube:dpvwib:dp0316
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  1. Daron Acemoglu & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1999. "The Structure of Wages and Investment in General Training," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(3), pages 539-572, June.
  2. Pischke, Jörn-Steffen, 2000. "Continuous Training in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 137, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Groot, Wim, 1995. "The Wage Effects of Investments in Enterprise-Related Training," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 133-47.
  4. Heckman, James J & Ichimura, Hidehiko & Todd, Petra E, 1997. "Matching as an Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(4), pages 605-54, October.
  5. John M. Barron & Mark C. Berger & Dan A. Black, 1997. "On-the-Job Training," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number ojt, April.
  6. Daron Acemoglu & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1998. "Beyond Becker: Training in Imperfect Labor Markets," NBER Working Papers 6740, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Joshua Angrist & Alan Krueger, 1998. "Empirical Strategies in Labor Economics," Working papers 98-7, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  8. Alison L. Booth & Gylfi Zoega, 2004. "Is wage compression a necessary condition for firm-financed general training?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(1), pages 88-97, January.
  9. Michael Gerfin, 2003. "Firm-sponsored Work-Related Training in Frictional Labour Markets: An empirical analysis for Switzerland," Diskussionsschriften dp0317, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.
  10. Goux, Dominique & Maurin, Eric, 2000. "Returns to firm-provided training: evidence from French worker-firm matched data1," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 1-19, January.
  11. Stevens, Margaret, 1994. "A Theoretical Model of On-the-Job Training with Imperfect Competition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(4), pages 537-62, October.
  12. John M. Barron & Mark C. Berger & Dan A. Black, 1999. "Do Workers Pay for On-The-Job Training?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(2), pages 235-252.
  13. repec:adr:anecst:y:1999:i:55-56:p:04 is not listed on IDEAS
  14. Ruth Miquel, 2003. "Identification of Effects of Dynamic Treatments with a Difference-in-Differences Approach," University of St. Gallen Department of Economics working paper series 2003 2003-06, Department of Economics, University of St. Gallen.
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