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The aims of lifelong learning: Age-related effects of training on wages and job security

  • Lang, Julia
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    This paper reports the effects of training participation on wages and perceived job security for employees of different ages. Based on data from the German Socio-Economic Panel, results indicate that only younger workers benefit from training by an increase in wages, whereas older employees worries about losing their job are reduced. This observation can also be explained by the fact that goals of training courses are related to the age of participants. Moreover, I differentiate between workers who permanently and only occasionally participate in training. The results indicate that there seem to be decreasing marginal returns to training with respect to job security.

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    File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/62073/1/VfS_2012_pid_294.pdf
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    Paper provided by Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association in its series Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century with number 62073.

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    Date of creation: 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc12:62073
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.socialpolitik.org/Email:


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    1. Muehler, Grit & Beckmann, Michael & Schauenberg, Bernd, 2007. "The Returns to Continuous Training in Germany: New Evidence from Propensity Score Matching Estimators," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-048, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    2. Goux, Dominique & Maurin, Eric, 2000. "Returns to firm-provided training: evidence from French worker-firm matched data1," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 1-19, January.
    3. Acemoglu, Daron & Pischke, Jörn-Steffen, 1998. "The Structure of Wages and Investment in General Training," CEPR Discussion Papers 1833, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Matteo PICCHIO & Jan C. van OURS, 2011. "Retaining through Training: Even for Older Workers," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2011017, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    5. Melero Martín, Eduardo, 2004. "Evidence on Training and Career Paths: Human Capital, Information and Incentives," IZA Discussion Papers 1377, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Santiago Budria & Pedro Telhado Pereira, 2007. "The wage effects of training in Portugal: differences across skill groups, genders, sectors and training types," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(6), pages 787-807.
    7. Michael Gerfin, 2003. "Work-Related Training and Wages: An empirical analysis for male workers in Switzerland," Diskussionsschriften dp0316, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.
    8. Bassanini, Andrea & Booth, Alison L. & Brunello, Giorgio & De Paola, Maria & Leuven, Edwin, 2005. "Workplace Training in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 1640, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Andrea Bassanini, 2006. "Training, wages and employment security: an empirical analysis on European data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(8), pages 523-527.
    10. Richard Blundell & Monica Costa Dias, 2008. "Alternative approaches to evaluation in empirical microeconomics," CeMMAP working papers CWP26/08, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    11. Alison L. Booth & Mark L. Bryan, 2005. "Testing Some Predictions of Human Capital Theory: New Training Evidence from Britain," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(2), pages 391-394, May.
    12. Alessandra Cataldi & Stephan Kampelmann & François Rycx, 2011. "Does it pay to be productive ?The case of age groups," DULBEA Working Papers 11-10, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    13. Lynch, Lisa M, 1992. "Private-Sector Training and the Earnings of Young Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 299-312, March.
    14. Benoit Dostie, 2007. "Wages, Productivity and Aging," CIRANO Working Papers 2007s-02, CIRANO.
    15. Katz, Eliakim & Ziderman, Adrian, 1990. "Investment in General Training: The Role of Information and Labour Mobility," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(403), pages 1147-58, December.
    16. Booth, Alison L, 1991. "Job-Related Formal Training: Who Receives It and What Is It Worth?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 53(3), pages 281-94, August.
    17. Edwin Leuven, 2005. "The Economics of Private Sector Training: A Survey of the Literature," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(1), pages 91-111, 02.
    18. Daron Acemoglu & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1998. "Beyond Becker: Training in Imperfect Labor Markets," NBER Working Papers 6740, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Pischke, Jörn-Steffen, 2000. "Continuous Training In Germany," CEPR Discussion Papers 2428, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    20. Loewenstein, Mark A & Spletzer, James R, 1998. "Dividing the Costs and Returns to General Training," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 142-71, January.
    21. repec:dgr:kubcen:2011040 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Ai, Chunrong & Norton, Edward C., 2003. "Interaction terms in logit and probit models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 123-129, July.
    23. Zwick, Thomas, 2011. "Why training older employees is less effective," ZEW Discussion Papers 11-046, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    24. Bo Hansson, 2008. "Job-Related Training and Benefits for Individuals: A Review of Evidence and Explanations," OECD Education Working Papers 19, OECD Publishing.
    25. Wooseok Ok & Peter Tergeist, 2003. "Improving Workers' Skills: Analytical Evidence and the Role of the Social Partners," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 10, OECD Publishing.
    26. Zimmermann, Klaus F., 1998. "German Job Mobility and Wages," IZA Discussion Papers 4, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    27. Andrea Bassanini, 2006. "Training, wages and employment security," Post-Print halshs-00120488, HAL.
    28. Vegard Skirbekk, 2003. "Age and individual productivity: a literature survey," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-028, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
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