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Les rendements de la formation en entreprise

  • Benoit Dostie
  • Marie-Pierre Pelletier

This article studies the impact of firm-sponsored training on productivity. The data used are taken from the Wo r k p l a c e and Employee Survey (WES) of Statistics Canada (1999­2002). The impact of training on productivity is measured by estimating a Cobb-Douglas production function, where investment in human capital is treated as a production input. Our methodology is distinguished from that used in earlier studies by the fact that we model the firm's decision to offer training or not as well as the effect of training on productivity, which allows us to take into account the selection bias associated with training decisions. Our results permit us to conclude that training designated as "formal" provides higher productivity gains than training regarded as informal. We note also that failure to account for selection bias results in an overestimation of the effects of formal and informal training on the productivity of firms.

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Article provided by University of Toronto Press in its journal Canadian Public Policy.

Volume (Year): 33 (2007)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 21-40

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Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:33:y:2007:i:1:p:21-40
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  1. Harley Frazis & Maury Gittleman & Mary Joyce, 2000. "Correlates of Training: An Analysis Using Both Employer and Employee Characteristics," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 53(3), pages 443-462, April.
  2. Black, Sandra E & Lynch, Lisa M, 1996. "Human-Capital Investments and Productivity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 263-67, May.
  3. Daron Acemoglu & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1996. "Why Do Firms Train? Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 5605, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Mincer, Jacob, 1984. "Human capital and economic growth," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 195-205, June.
  5. Gerfin, Michael, 2004. "Work-Related Training and Wages: An Empirical Analysis for Male Workers in Switzerland," IZA Discussion Papers 1078, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Acemoglu, Daron & Pischke, Jörn-Steffen, 1998. "The Structure of Wages and Investment in General Training," CEPR Discussion Papers 1833, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. James Levinsohn & Amil Petrin, 2003. "Estimating Production Functions Using Inputs to Control for Unobservables," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(2), pages 317-341.
  8. Dearden, Lorraine & Reed, Howard & Van Reenen, John, 2000. "Who Gains when Workers Train? Training and Corporate Productivity in a Panel of British Industries," CEPR Discussion Papers 2486, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Lisa M Lynch & Sandra E Black, 2002. "How to Compete: The Impact of Workplace Practices and Information Technology on Productivity," Working Papers 02-04, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  10. Johnson, Joanne & Baldwin, John R., 1995. "Developpement du capital humain et innovation : la formation dans les petites et moyennes entreprises," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 1995074f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
  11. Barron, John M & Black, Dan A & Loewenstein, Mark A, 1987. "Employer Size: The Implications for Search, Training, Capital Investment, Starting Wages, and Wage Growth," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(1), pages 76-89, January.
  12. Barrett, Alan & O'Connell, Philip J., 1999. "Does Training Generally Work? The Returns to In-Company Training," IZA Discussion Papers 51, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. Serge Coulombe & Jean-François Tremblay, 2004. "Literacy, Human Capital and Growth," Working Papers 0407E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
  14. Lynch, Lisa M, 1992. "Private-Sector Training and the Earnings of Young Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 299-312, March.
  15. Lisa M. Lynch & Sandra E. Black, 1998. "Beyond the Incidence of Employer-Provided Training," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(1), pages 64-81, October.
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