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Unions, training and firm performance

Author

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  • Addison, John T.
  • Belfield, Clive R.

Abstract

"This paper uses data from two British workplace surveys to examine the impact of unions on several training measures. It also evaluates the impact of unions and training on earnings and two measures of firm performance. Union effects on training emerge as fairly subtle, and are more positive when using individual rather than plant-wide training data. A positive impact of training on earnings is detected in individual and plant-wide wage data, albeit for one of the datasets. Union influence on wages is also muted and union-training interaction effects vary greatly. However, instrumenting training provides positive results for labour productivity and, again for one survey, for financial performance as well." (Author's abstract, IAB-Doku) ((en)) Additional Information Kurzfassung (deutsch) Executive summary (English)

Suggested Citation

  • Addison, John T. & Belfield, Clive R., 2007. "Unions, training and firm performance," Zeitschrift für ArbeitsmarktForschung - Journal for Labour Market Research, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany], vol. 40(4), pages 361-381.
  • Handle: RePEc:iab:iabzaf:v:2007:i:4:p:361-381
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    13. Addison, John T. & Belfield, Clive R., 2002. "Unions and Establishment Performance: Evidence from the British Workplace Industrial/Employee Relations Surveys," IZA Discussion Papers 455, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Ardiana N. Gashi & Geoff Pugh & Nick Adnett, 2010. "Technological change and employer-provided training: evidence from UK workplaces," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(4), pages 426-448, July.

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