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The Return to the Firm Investment in Human Capital

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  • Almeida, Rita K.

    () (World Bank)

  • Carneiro, Pedro

    () (University College London)

Abstract

In this paper we estimate the rate of return to firm investments in human capital in the form of formal job training. We use a panel of large firms with unusually detailed information on the duration of training, the direct costs of training, and several firm characteristics such as their output, workforce characteristics and capital stock. Our estimates of the return to training vary substantially across firms. On average it is -7% for firms not providing training and 24% for those providing training. Formal job training is a good investment for many firms and the economy, possibly yielding higher returns than either investments in physical capital or investments in schooling. In spite of this, observed amounts of formal training are very small.

Suggested Citation

  • Almeida, Rita K. & Carneiro, Pedro, 2006. "The Return to the Firm Investment in Human Capital," IZA Discussion Papers 1937, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1937
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Didier Fouarge & Trudie Schils & Andries de Grip, 2013. "Why do low-educated workers invest less in further training?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(18), pages 2587-2601, June.
    2. Maliranta, Mika & Asplund, Rita, 2007. "Training and Hiring Strategies to Improve Firm Performance," Discussion Papers 1105, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    3. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison Booth & Mark Bryan, 2010. "Are there asymmetries in the effects of training on the conditional male wage distribution?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(1), pages 251-272, January.
    4. Benoît Mahy & Mélanie Volral, 2008. "The effect of quantitative and qualitative training on labour demand in Belgium: a monopolistic competition approach," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0021, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    5. Prskawetz, Alexia & Veliov, Vladimir M., 2007. "Age-specific dynamic labor demand and human capital investment," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(12), pages 3741-3777, December.
    6. Galdo, Jose & Chong, Alberto, 2012. "Does the quality of public-sponsored training programs matter? Evidence from bidding processes data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 970-986.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    on-the-job training; panel data; production function; rate of return;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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