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Who gets over the training hurdle? A study of the training experiences of young men and women in Britain

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  • Wiji Arulampalam

    () (Department of Economics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK)

  • Alison L. Booth

    () (ESRC Centre on Micro-social Change, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park CO4 3SQ, UK)

Abstract

Using longitudinal data from the British National Child Development Study, this paper examines gender differences in the determinants of work-related training. The analysis covers a crucial decade in the working lives of this 1958 birth cohort of young men and women - the years spanning the ages of 23 to 33. Hurdle negative binomial models are used to estimate the number of work-related training events lasting at least three days. This approach takes into account the fact that more than half the men and two thirds of the women in the sample experienced no work-related training lasting three or more days over the period 1981 to 1991. Our analysis suggests that reliance on work-related training to improve the skills of the work force will result in an increase in the skills of the already educated, but will not improve the skills of individuals entering the labor market with relatively low levels of education. JEL classification: C25, I21, J24.

Suggested Citation

  • Wiji Arulampalam & Alison L. Booth, 1997. "Who gets over the training hurdle? A study of the training experiences of young men and women in Britain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 10(2), pages 197-217.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:10:y:1997:i:2:p:197-217
    Note: Received February 9, 1996/Accepted August 14, 1996
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    Keywords

    Hurdle count data models · training · skills segmentation.;

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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