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The determinants of work-related training in Britain in 1995 and the implications of employer size

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  • Richard Harris

Abstract

This study uses a familiar set of variables to characterize the determinants of training (based around individual characteristics, qualifications, and workplace characteristics). However, it goes further by using data drawn from a recent quarter of the UK Labour Force Survey, and thus contains an up-to-date and extensive set of core variables. The dependent variable used covers three subgroups: those who have never been offered training by their current employer; those who have been offered but did not receive training in the last three months; and those workers who received training within the last three months. The hypothesis that large employers not only provide more work-related training, but that they are also more willing to train workers with characteristics that indicate a lower probability of obtaining a return on any investment outlay, is tested. This was confirmed (especially for male workers), along with a range of results that mostly accord with previous studies into the determinants of UK employer-based training.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Harris, 1999. "The determinants of work-related training in Britain in 1995 and the implications of employer size," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(4), pages 451-463.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:31:y:1999:i:4:p:451-463
    DOI: 10.1080/000368499324165
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    Cited by:

    1. Peraita, Carlos, 2001. "Testing the Acemoglu-Pischke model in Spain," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 107-115, July.
    2. Andrey Aistov & Ekaterina Aleksandrova, 2015. "Individual Returns to Training in a Russian Firm," HSE Working papers WP BRP 101/EC/2015, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    3. Giorgio Brunello & Maria De Paola, 2004. "Market Failures and the Under-Provision of Training," CESifo Working Paper Series 1286, CESifo Group Munich.

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