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Crossing the Tracks? Trends in the Training of Male and Female Workers in Great Britain

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  • Melanie K. Jones
  • Paul L. Latreille
  • Peter J. Sloane

Abstract

A small number of recent empirical studies report the intriguing finding that the 'advantage' in training incidence previously enjoyed by men has been reversed. The present article explores the sources of this gender differential using Labour Force Survey data, updating previous British studies and providing further insights into the above phenomenon. The results suggest that the greater part of the gender 'gap' derives from differences in characteristics, among the most important being occupation, industry and sector. However, the increased training incidence among females over time is not explained by changes in characteristics and suggests preferences for training may have changed. Copyright (c) Blackwell Publishing Ltd/London School of Economics 2008.

Suggested Citation

  • Melanie K. Jones & Paul L. Latreille & Peter J. Sloane, 2008. "Crossing the Tracks? Trends in the Training of Male and Female Workers in Great Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 46(2), pages 268-282, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:46:y:2008:i:2:p:268-282
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    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-8543.2008.00677.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Giorgio Brunello & Francesca Gambarotto, 2004. "Agglomeration Effects on Employer-Provided Training: Evidence from the UK," CESifo Working Paper Series 1150, CESifo Group Munich.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jorge Calero & Josep-Oriol Escardíbul, 2014. "Barriers to non-formal professional training in Spain in periods of economic growth and crisis. An analysis with special attention to the effect of the previous human capital of workers," Working Papers 2014/12, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    2. repec:zbw:rwirep:0265 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:zbw:rwirep:0320 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. William Collier & Francis Green & Young-Bae Kim & John Peirson, 2011. "Education, Training and Economic Performance: Evidence from Establishment Survival Data," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 32(4), pages 336-361, December.
    5. Claudia Burgard & Katja Görlitz, 2014. "Continuous training, job satisfaction and gender: An empirical analysis using German panel data," Evidence-based HRM: A Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 2(2), pages 126-144, October.
    6. Claudia Burgard, 2012. "Gender Differences in Further Training Participation – The Role of Individuals, Households and Firms," Ruhr Economic Papers 0320, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    7. Francis Green & Alan Felstead & Duncan Gallie & Hande Inanc & Nick Jewson, 2016. "The Declining Volume of Workers’ Training in Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 54(2), pages 422-448, June.
    8. Dieckhoff, Martina & Steiber, Nadia, 2009. "In search of gender differences in access to continuing training: Is there a gender training gap and if yes, why?," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Skill Formation and Labor Markets SP I 2009-504, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    9. Philip Murphy & Paul L. Latreille & Melanie Jones & David Blackaby, 2008. "Is There a Public Sector Training Advantage? Evidence from the Workplace Employment Relations Survey," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 46(4), pages 674-701, December.
    10. Claudia Burgard & Katja Görlitz, 2011. "Continuous Training, Job Satisfaction and Gender – An Empirical Analysis Using German Panel Data," Ruhr Economic Papers 0265, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    11. Burgard, Claudia & Görlitz, Katja, 2011. "Continuous Training, Job Satisfaction and Gender – An Empirical Analysis Using German Panel Data," Ruhr Economic Papers 265, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    12. repec:eee:joecag:v:6:y:2015:i:c:p:163-175 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Burgard, Claudia, 2012. "Gender Differences in Further Training Participation – The Role of Individuals, Households and Firms," Ruhr Economic Papers 320, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.

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