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Persistence in the determination of work-related training participation: Evidence from the BHPS, 1991-1997

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  • Sousounis, Panos
  • Bladen-Hovell, Robin

Abstract

In this paper we investigate the role of workers' training history in determining current training-incidence. The analysis is conducted on an unbalanced sample comprising information on approximately 5000 employees from the first seven waves of the BHPS. Training participation is modelled as a dynamic random effects probit model where the effects of unobserved heterogeneity and initial conditions are accounted for in a fashion consistent with methods proposed by Chamberlain (1984) and Wooldridge (2005), respectively. The results suggest that prior training experience is a significant determinant of a worker's participation in a current training episode comparable with other formal educational qualifications.

Suggested Citation

  • Sousounis, Panos & Bladen-Hovell, Robin, 2010. "Persistence in the determination of work-related training participation: Evidence from the BHPS, 1991-1997," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1005-1015, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:29:y:2010:i:6:p:1005-1015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    12. van Smoorenburg, M. S. M. & van der Velden, R. K. W., 2000. "The training of school-leavers: Complementarity or substitution?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 207-217, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Picchio, Matteo & van Ours, Jan C., 2013. "Retaining through training even for older workers," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 29-48.
    2. Hector Sala & José Silva, 2013. "Labor productivity and vocational training: evidence from Europe," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 31-41, August.

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