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Barriers to non-formal professional training in Spain in periods of economic growth and crisis. An analysis with special attention to the effect of the previous human capital of workers

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  • Jorge Calero

    () (Universitat de Barcelona & IEB)

  • Josep-Oriol Escardíbul

    () (University of Barcelona & IEB)

Abstract

We analyze the determining factors of access to non-formal professional training in Spain and their evolution in recent years. Specifically, a comparison is made between a moment during a period of economic growth (2007) and the current crisis period (2012). The data used is from the Economically Active Population Survey. The sample is divided according to gender and interaction variables are included to analyze the differential effects of human capital on the probability of receiving training in the two periods considered. The hypothesis is that there are significant barriers that make access to non-formal professional training difficult (we focus on previous human capital available) and that these barriers have not ceased to operate during the economic crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Jorge Calero & Josep-Oriol Escardíbul, 2014. "Barriers to non-formal professional training in Spain in periods of economic growth and crisis. An analysis with special attention to the effect of the previous human capital of workers," Working Papers 2014/12, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  • Handle: RePEc:ieb:wpaper:2013/6/doc2014-12
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daron Acemoglu & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 1998. "Why Do Firms Train? Theory and Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(1), pages 79-119.
    2. Shandre Thangavelu & Liu Haoming & Park Cheolsung & Ang Boon Heng & James Wong, 2011. "The determinants of training participation in Singapore," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(29), pages 4641-4649.
    3. Didier Fouarge & Trudie Schils & Andries de Grip, 2013. "Why do low-educated workers invest less in further training?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(18), pages 2587-2601, June.
    4. Biagetti, Marco & Scicchitano, Sergio, 2009. "Inequality in workers’ lifelong learning across european countries: Evidence from EU-SILC data-set," MPRA Paper 17356, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Lisa M. Lynch & Sandra E. Black, 1998. "Beyond the Incidence of Employer-Provided Training," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(1), pages 64-81, October.
    6. Hendel, Igal & Shapiro, Joel & Willen, Paul, 2005. "Educational opportunity and income inequality," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 841-870, June.
    7. Cecilia Albert & Carlos García-Serrano & Virginia Hernanz, 2004. "Firm-provided training and temporary contracts," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 67-88, January.
    8. Melanie K. Jones & Paul L. Latreille & Peter J. Sloane, 2008. "Crossing the Tracks? Trends in the Training of Male and Female Workers in Great Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 46(2), pages 268-282, June.
    9. Juan José Dolado & Florentino Felgueroso & Francisco Jimeno, 1999. "Los problemas del mercado de trabajo juvenil en España: empleo, formación y salarios mínimos," EKONOMIAZ. Revista vasca de Economía, Gobierno Vasco / Eusko Jaurlaritza / Basque Government, vol. 43(01), pages 136-157.
    10. Cecilia ALBERT & Carlos GARCÍA-SERRANO & Virginia HERNANZ, 2010. "On-the-job training in Europe: Determinants and wage returns," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 149(3), pages 315-341, September.
    11. Gérard Ballot & Fathi Fakhfakh & Erol Taymaz, 2006. "Who Benefits from Training and R&D, the Firm or the Workers?," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 44(3), pages 473-495, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Lifelong learning; professional training; access to training; barriers to training; human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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