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Determinants of Young Males' Schooling and Training Choices

In: Training and the Private Sector: International Comparisons

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  • Stephen Cameron
  • James J. Heckman

Abstract

This paper examines the determinants of GED acquisition. high school graduation and postsecondary training and schooling choices. Economic factors determining dropping out are considered. The determinants of high school certification by exam are fundamentally different from the determinants of ordinary high school graduation. GED graduates are more likely to take vocational and technical training while ordinary graduates are more likely to attend academic programs. GED recipients are much less likely to complete the post-secondary programs they begin. The GED exam does not measure the ability or motivation that predicts successful completion of post-secondary schooling and training programs. Participation in post-secondary nonacademic training is positively related to family resources. Thus both academic and non-academic training operate to reinforce initial family earnings inequalities.
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Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Cameron & James J. Heckman, 1994. "Determinants of Young Males' Schooling and Training Choices," NBER Chapters,in: Training and the Private Sector: International Comparisons, pages 201-232 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8782
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    1. Cameron, Stephen V & Heckman, James J, 1993. "The Nonequivalence of High School Equivalents," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 1-47, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Richard J. Murnane & John B. Willett & Kathryn Parker Boudett, 1997. "Does Acquisition of a GED Lead to More Training, Post-Secondary Education, and Military Service for School Dropouts?," NBER Working Papers 5992, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. McIntosh, Steven, 1999. "A cross-country comparison of the determinants of vocational training," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20213, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Tyler, John H. & Murnane, Richard J. & Willett, John B., 2004. "The devil's in the details: evidence from the GED on large effects of small differences in high stakes exams," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 339-349, August.
    4. Richard J. Murnane & John B. Willett & John H. Tyler, 2000. "Who Benefits from Obtaining a GED? Evidence from High School and Beyond," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 23-37.
    5. Gautam Hazarika, 2002. "The Role of Credit Constraints in the Cyclicality of College Enrolments," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 133-143.
    6. Jean-Yves Duclos & Paul Makdissi, 2004. "Restricted and Unrestricted Dominance for Welfare, Inequality, and Poverty Orderings," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 6(1), pages 145-164, February.
    7. Ichino, Andrea & Muehlheusser, Gerd, 2008. "How often should you open the door?: Optimal monitoring to screen heterogeneous agents," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, pages 820-831.
    8. Anna Aizer & Joseph J. Doyle, 2015. "Juvenile Incarceration, Human Capital, and Future Crime: Evidence from Randomly Assigned Judges," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 130(2), pages 759-803.
    9. Daniel Parent, 2002. "The Causal Effect of High School Employment on Educational Attainment in Canada," CIRANO Working Papers 2002s-28, CIRANO.
    10. Daniel Parent, 1999. "Labour Market Outcomes and Schooling in Canada: Has the Value of a High School Degree Changed over Time?," CIRANO Working Papers 99s-42, CIRANO.
    11. Maria Carme Riera i Prunera, 2003. "Deficit, human capital and economic growth dynamics," Working Papers in Economics 102, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
    12. Daniel Parent, 2001. "Return to a High School Diploma and the Decision to Drop Out: New Evidence from Canada," CIRANO Working Papers 2001s-09, CIRANO.

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