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Skills Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Richard K. Johanson
  • Arvil V. Adams

Abstract

The review addresses a list of questions that seem especially pertinent for skills development in Sub-Saharan Africa today, namely: What should be the role of training when there is not enough modern sector employment? Given the widespread decay in public training systems, what should be the role of the public sector in training? Are private training providers more cost-effective than public sector training providers? What is the capacity of private training providers to fill the gap left by declining public investment in training? What is the relative importance of training within enterprises and does the state need to intervene to stimulate it? In view of shortages of public financing, how can needed skills development be financed? What role can financing mechanisms play in improving the effectiveness and efficiency of training? Answers to these questions and others developed in each chapter are pursued by looking over the past decade at the structure of employment and the demand for skills; the experience of government and non-government providers of skills training, including enterprises; and the experience with financing of TVET and resource management. The findings yield a clear, strategic role for governments to play in skills development while deepening sector reforms. The actions, if taken, promise to support achievement of the Millennium Development Goals for poverty reduction and Education for All.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard K. Johanson & Arvil V. Adams, 2004. "Skills Development in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15028, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:15028
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Isaac Addai & Jelena Pokimica, 2012. "An Exploratory Study of Trust and Material Hardship in Ghana," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 109(3), pages 413-438, December.
    2. Rosholm, Michael & Nielsen, Helena Skyt & Dabalen, Andrew, 2007. "Evaluation of training in African enterprises," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 310-329, September.
    3. Palmer, Robert., 2008. "Skills and productivity in the informal economy," ILO Working Papers 994131423402676, International Labour Organization.
    4. repec:ilo:ilowps:487920 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. World Bank, 2010. "Republic of Yemen Education Status Report : Challenges and Opportunities," World Bank Other Operational Studies 18516, The World Bank.
    6. World Bank, 2007. "Building Knowledge Economies : Advanced Strategies for Development," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6853.
    7. Kirui, Oliver K. & Kozicka, Marta, 2018. "Vocational Education and Training for Farmers and Other Actors in the Agri-Food Value Chain in Africa," Working Papers 274536, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    8. Christophe Nordman & Laure Pasquier-Doumer, 2012. "Vocational Education, On-the-Job Training and Labour Market Integration of Young Workers in Urban West Africa," Working Papers DT/2012/13, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    9. Zuzana Brixiova & Thierry Kangoye, 2014. "Youth Unemployment in Africa: New Evidence and Policies from Swaziland," AIEL Series in Labour Economics,in: Dario Sciulli & Miguel Ángel Malo (ed.), Disadvantaged Workers, edition 1, chapter 9, pages 181-202 AIEL - Associazione Italiana Economisti del Lavoro.
    10. repec:dau:papers:123456789/5948 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Rita Almeida & Jere Behrman & David Robalino, 2012. "The Right Skills for the Job? Rethinking Training Policies for Workers," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13075, June.
    12. Gruber, Lloyd & Kosack, Stephen, 2014. "The tertiary tilt: education and inequality in the developing world," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 54202, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    13. Paul Beaudry & Patrick Francois, 2007. "The Economics of Inefficient Technology Use," NBER Working Papers 13500, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Ndegwa, Michael K. & De Groote, Hugo & Gitonga, Zachary M., 2015. "Evaluation of artisan training in metal silo construction for grain storage in Africa: Impact on uptake, entrepreneurship and income," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 12-21.
    15. Marta Favara & Irajen Appasamy & Marito H. Garcia, 2015. "Nigeria," World Bank Other Operational Studies 24454, The World Bank.
    16. repec:ilo:ilowps:410633 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Zuzana Brixiova & Thierry Kangoye, 2013. "Working Paper 175 - Youth Employment in Africa: New Evidence and Policies from Swaziland," Working Paper Series 472, African Development Bank.
    18. Sajitha Bashir, 2009. "Changing the Trajectory : Education and Training for Youth in Democratic Republic of Congo," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 5928.
    19. repec:dau:papers:123456789/10596 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Pia Peeters & Wendy Cunningham & Gayatri Acharya & Arvil Van Adams, 2009. "Youth Employment in Sierra Leone : Sustainable Livelihood Opportunities in a Post-conflict Setting," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2599.
    21. Gruber, Lloyd & Kosack, Stephen, 2014. "The Tertiary Tilt: Education and Inequality in the Developing World," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 253-272.
    22. Roberta Gatti & Diego F. Angel-Urdinola & Joana Silva & Andras Bodor, 2014. "Striving for Better Jobs : The Challenge of Informality in the Middle East and North Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 19905.
    23. Axmann, Michael. & Rhoades, Amy. & Nordstrum, Lee. & La Rue, Josée-Anne. & Byusa, Michelle., 2015. "Vocational teachers and trainers in a changing world : the imperative of high-quality teacher training systems," ILO Working Papers 994879203402676, International Labour Organization.

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