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The Evolutionary Foundations of Economics

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  • Dopfer,Kurt

Abstract

It is widely recognised that mainstream economics has failed to translate micro consistently into macro economics and to provide endogenous explanations for the continual changes in the economic system. Since the early 1980s, a growing number of economists have been trying to provide answers to these two key questions by applying an evolutionary approach. This new departure has yielded a rich literature with enormous variety, but the unifying principles connecting the various ideas and views presented are, as yet, not apparent. This 2005 volume brings together fifteen original articles from scholars - each of whom has made a significant contribution to the field - in their common effort to reconstruct economics as an evolutionary science. Using meso economics as an analytical entity to bridge micro and macro economics as well as static and dynamic realms, a unified economic theory emerges.

Suggested Citation

  • Dopfer,Kurt (ed.), 2005. "The Evolutionary Foundations of Economics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521621991.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521621991
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    Cited by:

    1. Marek Vokoun, 2016. "Innovation behaviour of firms in a small open economy: the case of the Czech manufacturing industry," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 43(1), pages 111-139, February.
    2. Cristiano Antonelli, 2009. "The economics of innovation: from the classical legacies to the economics of complexity," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(7), pages 611-646.
    3. Ann Hartell, 2013. "Path dependence in economic theory and research," SRE-Disc sre-disc-2013_03, Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    4. Wolfram Elsner, 2007. "Why Meso? On “Aggregation” and “Emergence”, and Why and How the Meso Level is Essential in Social Economics," Forum for Social Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(1), pages 1-16, January.
    5. Ehrenfeld, Wilfried, 2012. "Towards a Theory of Climate Innovation - A Model Framework for Analyzing Drivers and Determinants," IWH Discussion Papers 1/2012, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    6. Brendan Markey-Towler & John Foster, 2013. "Understanding the causes of income inequality in complex economic systems," Discussion Papers Series 478, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    7. Sebastián Aparicio & Andrés Ramírez Hassan & Diego Fernando Gómez Sánchez, 2013. "Elección de ocupaciones que generen empleo usando modelos de elección discreta: Medellín Área Metropolitana 2009," ESTUDIOS GERENCIALES, UNIVERSIDAD ICESI, December.
    8. repec:spr:joevec:v:27:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s00191-017-0512-x is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Giovanni Dosi & Marco Grazzi, 2006. "Technologies as problem-solving procedures and technologies as input--output relations: some perspectives on the theory of production," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(1), pages 173-202, February.
    10. Dopfer, Kurt & Potts, Jason, 2010. "Why evolutionary realism underpins evolutionary economic analysis and theory: A reply to Runde's critique," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(03), pages 401-413, September.

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