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Panel time-series modeling: New tools for analyzing xt data

  • Markus Eberhardt

    (University of Oxford)

Stata already has an extensive range of built-in and user-written commands for analyzing xt (cross-sectional time-series) data. However, most of these commands do not take into account important features of the data relating to their time-series properties or cross-sectional dependence. This talk reviews the recent literature concerned with these features with reference to the types of data in which they arise. Most of the talk will be spent discussing and illustrating various Stata commands for analyzing these types of data, including several new user-written commands. The talk should be of general interest to users of xt data and of particular interest to researchers with panel datasets in which countries or regions are the unit of analysis and there is also a substantial time-series element. Over the past two decades, a literature dedicated to the analysis of macro panel data has concerned itself with some of the idiosyncrasies of this type of data, including variable nonstationarity and cointegration, as well as with the investigation of possible parameter heterogeneity across panel members and its implications for estimation and inference. Most recently, this literature has turned its attention to concerns over cross-sectional dependence, which can arise either in the form of unobservable global shocks that differ in their impact across countries (for example, the recent financial crisis) or as spillover effects (again, unobservable) between a subset of countries or regions.

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File URL: http://repec.org/usug2011/UK11_Eberhardt.pdf
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Paper provided by Stata Users Group in its series United Kingdom Stata Users' Group Meetings 2011 with number 22.

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Date of creation: 26 Sep 2011
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Handle: RePEc:boc:usug11:22
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.stata.com/meeting/uk11

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  1. Pesaran, M.H. & Smith, R., 1992. "Estimating Long-Run Relationships From Dynamic Heterogeneous Panels," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9215, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  2. M. Hashem Pesaran & L. Vanessa Smith & Takashi Yamagata, 2008. "Panel Unit Root Tests in the Presence of a Multifactor Error Structure," CESifo Working Paper Series 2193, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Chihwa Kao & Suzanne McCoskey, 1997. "A Residual-Based Test Of The Null Of Cointegration In Panel Data," Econometrics 9711002, EconWPA.
  4. Coakley, Jerry & Fuertes, Ana-Maria & Smith, Ron, 2006. "Unobserved heterogeneity in panel time series models," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 50(9), pages 2361-2380, May.
  5. Francesco Moscone & Elisa Tosetti, 2009. "A Review And Comparison Of Tests Of Cross-Section Independence In Panels," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(3), pages 528-561, 07.
  6. Markus Eberhardt & Francis Teal, 2008. "Modeling Technology and Technological Change in Manufacturing: How do Countries Differ?," CSAE Working Paper Series 2008-12, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  7. Jushan Bai & Serena Ng, 2004. "A PANIC Attack on Unit Roots and Cointegration," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(4), pages 1127-1177, 07.
  8. Kaddour Hadri, 2000. "Testing for stationarity in heterogeneous panel data," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 3(2), pages 148-161.
  9. Jushan Bai & Serena Ng, 2000. "Determining the Number of Factors in Approximate Factor Models," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1504, Econometric Society.
  10. Peter Pedroni, 2004. "Panel Cointegration: Asymptotic and Finite Sample Properties of Pooled Time Series Tests with an Application to the PPP Hypothesis," Department of Economics Working Papers 2004-15, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  11. Markus Eberhardt & Francis Teal, 2010. "Productivity Analysis in Global Manufacturing Production," DEGIT Conference Papers c015_019, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
  12. Francis Teal & Markus Eberhardt, 2008. "Modeling Technology and Technological Change in Manufacturing: How do Countries Differ?," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2008-12, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  13. Badi H. Baltagi & Chihwa Kao, 2000. "Nonstationary Panels, Cointegration in Panels and Dynamic Panels: A Survey," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 16, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  14. Kao, Chihwa, 1999. "Spurious regression and residual-based tests for cointegration in panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 90(1), pages 1-44, May.
  15. M. Hashem Pesaran, 2007. "A simple panel unit root test in the presence of cross-section dependence," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(2), pages 265-312.
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