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Do export price elasticities support tensions in currency markets? Evidence from China and six OECD countries

  • Aiello, Francesco
  • Bonanno, Graziella
  • Via, Alessia

The empirical literature on trade imbalances does not make currency tensions easy to understand, because tensions across traders originate from the assumption that export-price elasticity is high. This paper provides new evidence by analysing the export-behaviour of China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, UK, and the USA from 1990 to 2012. Estimates of export-price elasticities have been made using panel data techniques for non-stationary data. Long run relationships are stable to any structural break and indicate that exports are heavily dependent on world income, with long run income elasticity significantly higher than unity in many cases (China, Japan, Germany, UK and USA). Conversely, exports are price inelastic for most of the countries in the sample, in both the long and short runs. The exception is France, whose exports in the long run would increase by 2 percent if the country experienced a 1 percent depreciation of its real exchange rate.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 56727.

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Date of creation: 18 Jun 2014
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:56727
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