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Impact of AIDS-Related Mortality on Farm Household Welfare in Zambia

Listed author(s):
  • Antony Chapoto
  • T. S. Jayne

This article uses nationally representative panel data on 5,420 rural households in Zambia, surveyed in 2001 and 2004, to measure the impacts of HIV/AIDS-related prime-age mortality on livelihoods. Using age group and drought shock interactions as instruments for prime-age mortality, we find that prime-age mortality is endogenous in pooled OLS models. However, differencing the time-invariant unobserved household characteristics largely addressed the endogeneity problem. The difference models suggest that the gender and position of the deceased in the household as well as pre-death household characteristics strongly condition the effects of mortality on household welfare outcomes. Most notably, the death of the male household head leads to relatively severe impacts on farm production and livestock assets compared to the death of other adults. Also, the impact of adult mortality is more severe among households that were initially relatively poor. Contrary to conventional wisdom, we find no clear pattern of shifts to labor-saving crops among afflicted households.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/522894
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Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Economic Development and Cultural Change.

Volume (Year): 56 (2008)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages: 327-374

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:v:56:y:2008:p:327-374
DOI: 10.1086/522894
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/EDCC/

References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Yamano, Takashi & Jayne, T. S., 2004. "Measuring the Impacts of Working-Age Adult Mortality on Small-Scale Farm Households in Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 91-119, January.
  2. Martha Ainsworth & Kathleen Beegle & Godlike Koda, 2005. "The Impact of Adult Mortality and Parental Deaths on Primary Schooling in North-Western Tanzania," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(3), pages 412-439.
  3. M Lundberg & M Over & P Mujinja, 2000. "Sources of Financial Assistance for Households Suffering an Adult Death in Kagera, Tanzania," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 68(5), pages 420-443, December.
  4. Donovan, Cynthia & Bailey, Linda & Mpyisi, Edson & Weber, Michael T., 2003. "Prime-Age Adult Morbidity and Mortality in Rural Rwanda: Effects on Household Income, Agricultural Production, and Food Security Strategies," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55387, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  5. Mather, David & Donovan, Cynthia & Jayne, Thomas S. & Weber, Michael T. & Chapoto, Antony & Mazhangara, Edward & Bailey, Linda & Yoo, Kyeongwon & Yamano, Takashi & Mghenyi, Elliot W., 2004. "A Cross-Country Analysis of Household Responses to Adult Mortality in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa: Implications For HIV/AIDS Mitigation And Rural Development Policies," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54571, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  6. Simon Gregson & Heather Waddell & Stephen Chandiwana, 2001. "School education and HIV control in sub-Saharan Africa: from discord to harmony?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(4), pages 467-485.
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