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A Test of the New Variant Famine Hypothesis: Panel Survey Evidence from Zambia

Author

Listed:
  • Mason, Nicole M.
  • Jayne, Thomas S.
  • Chapoto, Antony
  • Myers, Robert J.

Abstract

Replaced with revised version of paper 08/04/09.

Suggested Citation

  • Mason, Nicole M. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Chapoto, Antony & Myers, Robert J., 2009. "A Test of the New Variant Famine Hypothesis: Panel Survey Evidence from Zambia," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51485, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae09:51485
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/51485
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Mather & Cynthia Donovan & T. S. Jayne & Michael Weber, 2005. "Using Empirical Information in the Era of HIV/AIDS to Inform Mitigation and Rural Development Strategies: Selected Results from African Country Studies," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(5), pages 1289-1297.
    2. Yamano, Takashi & Jayne, T. S., 2004. "Measuring the Impacts of Working-Age Adult Mortality on Small-Scale Farm Households in Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 91-119, January.
    3. Antony Chapoto & T. S. Jayne, 2008. "Impact of AIDS-Related Mortality on Farm Household Welfare in Zambia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56, pages 327-374.
    4. Mather, David & Donovan, Cynthia & Weber, Michael T. & de Marrule, Higino Francisco & Alage, Albertina, 2004. "Household Responses to Prime Age Adult Mortality in Rural Mozambique: Implications for HIV/AIDS Mitigation Efforts and Rural Economic Development Policies," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 56060, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. John Hoddinott, 2006. "Shocks and their consequences across and within households in Rural Zimbabwe," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(2), pages 301-321.
    6. Gillespie, Stuart, 2006. "AIDS, poverty, and hunger: challenges and responses," Food policy statements 43, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Suneetha Kadiyala & Stuart Gillespie, 2006. "Community-level Impacts of AIDS-Related Mortality: Panel Survey Evidence from Zambia ," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 28(3), pages 440-457.
    8. Megill, David J., 2004. "Recommendations on Sample Design for Post-Harvest Surveys in Zambia Based on the 2000 Census," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54468, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    9. Bryceson, Deborah Fahy & Fonseca, Jodie, 2006. "Risking death for survival: Peasant responses to hunger and HIV/AIDS in Malawi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(9), pages 1654-1666, September.
    10. Donovan, Cynthia & Bailey, Linda & Mpyisi, Edson & Weber, Michael T., 2003. "Prime-Age Adult Morbidity and Mortality in Rural Rwanda: Effects on Household Income, Agricultural Production, and Food Security Strategies," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55387, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kusunose, Yoko & Tembo, Solomon & Mason, Nicole M., 2015. "Do crop income shocks widen disparities in smallholder agricultural investments? Panel survey evidence from Zambia," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205555, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    2. Resnick, Danielle & Thurlow, James, 2014. "The political economy of Zambia’s recovery: Structural change without transformation?:," IFPRI discussion papers 1320, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    HIV/AIDS; food security; rural livelihoods; new variant famine hypothesis; Zambia; Africa; Food Security and Poverty; International Development; Q12;

    JEL classification:

    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets

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