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Impact of HIV/AIDS-Related Deaths on Rural Farm Households' Welfare in Zambia: Implications for Poverty Reduction Strategies

  • Chapoto, Antony
  • Jayne, Thomas S.

Using comprehensive rural farm household longitudinal data from Zambia, this paper measures the impacts of prime-age (PA) adult morbidity and mortality on crop production and cropping patterns, household size, livestock and non-farm income. The paper adopts and extends the counterfactual (difference-in-difference) approach by controlling for initial (pre-death) household conditions that may influence the severity of the impacts of adult mortality. In particular, the study controls for initial poverty status, landholding size, effective dependency ratios, and the gender and position of the deceased person. Moreover, the possibility that PA death in the household is endogenous is taken into account by conceptualizing the measurement of effects of prime-age adult death on rural agricultural households’ welfare as a two stage process: first, by examining the characteristics of afflicted households; and second, conditional on being afflicted, determining the effects of morbidity and mortality on indicators of household welfare both prior to and after mortality. The findings from this study provide important information that may assist governments, donors, and development planners in developing specific policies or interventions to mitigate the impacts of the disease on vulnerable households.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/54473
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Paper provided by Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics in its series Food Security Collaborative Working Papers with number 54473.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:54473
Contact details of provider: Postal: Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture, 446 West Circle Dr., Rm 202, East Lansing, MI 48824-1039
Phone: (517) 355-4563
Fax: (517) 432-1800
Web page: http://www.aec.msu.edu/agecon/
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  1. Simon Gregson & Heather Waddell & Stephen Chandiwana, 2001. "School education and HIV control in sub-Saharan Africa: from discord to harmony?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(4), pages 467-485.
  2. Yamano, Takashi & Jayne, Thomas S., 2004. "Working-age Adult Mortality and Primary School Attendance in Rural Kenya," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 54645, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  3. James J. Heckman, 1976. "The Common Structure of Statistical Models of Truncation, Sample Selection and Limited Dependent Variables and a Simple Estimator for Such Models," NBER Chapters, in: Annals of Economic and Social Measurement, Volume 5, number 4, pages 475-492 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Mather, David & Donovan, Cynthia & Jayne, Thomas S. & Weber, Michael T. & Chapoto, Antony & Mazhangara, Edward & Bailey, Linda & Yoo, Kyeongwon & Yamano, Takashi & Mghenyi, Elliot W., 2004. "A Cross-Country Analysis of Household Responses to Adult Mortality in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa: Implications For HIV/AIDS Mitigation And Rural Development Policies," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54571, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  5. Donovan, Cynthia & Bailey, Linda & Mpyisi, Edson & Weber, Michael T., 2003. "Prime-Age Adult Morbidity and Mortality in Rural Rwanda: Effects on Household Income, Agricultural Production, and Food Security Strategies," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55387, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  6. John Strauss & Paul J. Gertler & Omar Rahman & Kristin Fox, 1993. "Gender and Life-Cycle Differentials in the Patterns and Determinants of Adult Health," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(4), pages 791-837.
  7. Yamano, Takashi & Jayne, Thomas S., 2003. "Measuring the Effects of Prime-age Adult Mortality in Kenya," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 54642, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  8. Beegle, Kathleen, 2003. "Labor effects of adult mortality in Tanzanian households," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3062, The World Bank.
  9. John Fitzgerald & Peter Gottschalk & Robert Moffitt, 1998. "An Analysis of Sample Attrition in Panel Data: The Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics," NBER Technical Working Papers 0220, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Lundberg, Mattias & Over, Mead & Mujinja, Phare, 2000. "Sources of financial assistance for households suffering an adult death in Kagera, Tanzania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2508, The World Bank.
  11. Jayne, Thomas S. & Villarrea, Marcela & Pingali, Prabhu L. & Hemrich, Gunter, 2005. "HIV/AIDS and the Agricultural Sector: Implications for Policy in Eastern and Southern Africa," eJADE: electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization, Agricultural and Development Economics Division, vol. 2(2).
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