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Interactions Between the Agricultural Sector and the HIV/AIDS Pandemic: Implications for agricultural policy

Author

Listed:
  • Thom S. Jayne
  • Marcela Villarreal
  • Prabhu Pingali

    (Agricultural and Development Economics Division, Food and Agriculture Organization)

  • Günter Hemrich

Abstract

This paper considers how the design of agricultural policies and programmes might be modified to better achieve policy objectives in the context of severe HIV epidemics and underscores the central role of agricultural policy in mitigating the spread and impacts of the epidemic. Based on projections of future demographic change in the hardest-hit countries of eastern and southern Africa, HIV/AIDS is likely to have the following effects on the agricultural sector: (1) increased rural inequality caused by disproportionately severe effects of AIDS on relatively poor households; (2) a reduction in household assets and wealth, leading to less capital-intensive cropping systems for severely affected communities and households; and (3) problems in transferring knowledge of crop husbandry and marketing to the succeeding generation of African farmers. It is argued that -- even though the absolute number of working age adults in the hardest-hit countries is projected to remain roughly the same over the next two decades -- the cost of labour in agriculture may rise in some areas as increasing scarcity of capital (notably, animal draft power for land preparation and weeding) will increase the demand for labour in agricultural production or shift agricultural systems to less labour- and capital-intensive crops.

Suggested Citation

  • Thom S. Jayne & Marcela Villarreal & Prabhu Pingali & Günter Hemrich, 2004. "Interactions Between the Agricultural Sector and the HIV/AIDS Pandemic: Implications for agricultural policy," Working Papers 04-06, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
  • Handle: RePEc:fao:wpaper:0406
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Yamano, Takashi & Jayne, T. S., 2004. "Measuring the Impacts of Working-Age Adult Mortality on Small-Scale Farm Households in Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 91-119, January.
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    3. Cuddington, John T, 1993. "Further Results on the Macroeconomic Effects of AIDS: The Dualistic, Labor-Surplus Economy," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 7(3), pages 403-417, September.
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    10. Pillai, Vijayan K. & Sunil, T. S. & Gupta, Rashmi, 2003. "AIDS Prevention in Zambia: Implications for Social Services," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 149-161, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Darana Souza & Danuta Chmielewska, 2011. "Public Support to Food Security in India, Brazil and South Africa: Elements for a Policy Dialogue," Working Papers 80, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    2. Scott Naysmith & Alex Waal & Alan Whiteside, 2009. "Revisiting new variant famine: the case of Swaziland," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 1(3), pages 251-260, September.
    3. Lambrou, Yianna & Laub, Regina, 2006. "Gender, Local Knowledge, and Lessons Learnt in Documenting and Conserving Agrobiodiversity," WIDER Working Paper Series 069, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Curry, John & Wiegers, Esther & Garbero, Alessandra & Stokes, Shannon & Hourihan, John, 2006. "Gender, HIV/AIDS and Rural Livelihoods: Micro-Level Investigations in Three African Countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 110, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    AIDS; Food policies; HIV infections; Human immunodeficiency virus; Right to food; Self sufficiency;

    JEL classification:

    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy
    • J43 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Agricultural Labor Markets
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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