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Economics, Psychology, and Social Dynamics of Consumer Bidding in Auctions

  • Amar Cheema


  • Peter Leszczyc
  • Rajesh Bagchi
  • Richard Bagozzi
  • James Cox
  • Utpal Dholakia
  • Eric Greenleaf
  • Amit Pazgal
  • Michael Rothkopf
  • Michael Shen
  • Shyam Sunder
  • Robert Zeithammer

With increasing numbers of consumers in auction marketplaces, we highlight some recent approaches that bring additional economic, social, and psychological factors to bear on existing economic theory to better understand and explain consumers' behavior in auctions. We also highlight specific research streams that could contribute towards enriching existing economic models of bidding behavior in emerging market mechanisms. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

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Article provided by Springer in its journal Marketing Letters.

Volume (Year): 16 (2005)
Issue (Month): 3 (December)
Pages: 401-413

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Handle: RePEc:kap:mktlet:v:16:y:2005:i:3:p:401-413
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  24. repec:att:wimass:9215 is not listed on IDEAS
  25. Herbert A. Simon, 1955. "A Behavioral Model of Rational Choice," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(1), pages 99-118.
  26. Bulow, Jeremy & Klemperer, Paul, 1996. "Auctions versus Negotiations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(1), pages 180-94, March.
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  30. William James Adams & Janet L. Yellen, 1976. "Commodity Bundling and the Burden of Monopoly," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 90(3), pages 475-498.
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