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Resource Rents, Redistribution, and Halving Global Poverty: The Resource Dividend

  • Segal, Paul

Summary This paper considers the proposal that each country distributes its resource rents directly to citizens as a universal and unconditional cash transfer, or Resource Dividend, and estimates its potential impact on global poverty for the years 2000-06. Using a global dataset on resource rents and the distribution of income, I find that if every developing country implemented the policy then the number of people living below $1-a-day would be cut by between 27% and 66%, depending on the year and the assumptions made. Looking ahead, poverty could be better than halved as long as commodity prices do not drop below their 2004 level.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 39 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 (April)
Pages: 475-489

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:39:y:2011:i:4:p:475-489
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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