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Addressing the Natural Resource Curse: An Illustration from Nigeria

In: Economic Policy Options for a Prosperous Nigeria

Author

Listed:
  • Xavier Sala-i-Martin
  • Arvind Subramanian

Abstract

Nigeria has been a disastrous development experience. On just about every conceivable metric, Nigeria’s performance since independence has been dismal. In PPP terms, Nigeria’s per capita GDP was $1113 in 1970 and is estimated to have remained at $1084 in 2000. The latter figure places Nigeria amongst the 15 poorest nations in the world for which such data are available.

Suggested Citation

  • Xavier Sala-i-Martin & Arvind Subramanian, 2008. "Addressing the Natural Resource Curse: An Illustration from Nigeria," Palgrave Macmillan Books, in: Paul Collier & Chukwuma C. Soludo & Catherine Pattillo (ed.), Economic Policy Options for a Prosperous Nigeria, chapter 3, pages 61-92, Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:palchp:978-0-230-58319-1_4
    DOI: 10.1057/9780230583191_4
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Real Exchange Rate; Institutional Quality; Real Effective Exchange Rate; Dutch Disease; Institution Equation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
    • O5 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General

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