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Voracity and Growth


  • Aaron Tornell
  • Philip R. Lane


We analyze an economy that lacks a strong legal-political institutional infrastructure an dis populated by multiple powerful groups. Powerful groups dynamically interact via fiscal process that effectively allows open access to the aggregate capital stock. In equilibrium, this leads to slow economic growth and a voracity effect,' by which a shock, such as a terms of trade windfall, perversely generates a more than proportionate increase in fiscal redistribution and reduces growth. We also show that a dilution in the concentration of power leads to faster growth and a less procyclical response to shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Aaron Tornell & Philip R. Lane, 1998. "Voracity and Growth," NBER Working Papers 6498, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:6498

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 1997. "Africa's Growth Tragedy: Policies and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1203-1250.
    2. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew M. Warner, 1995. "Natural Resource Abundance and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 5398, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Jan Gunning & Paul Collier, 1996. "Policy towards Commodity Shocks in Developing Countries," IMF Working Papers 96/84, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tornell, Aaron, 1999. "Voracity and growth in discrete time," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 139-145, January.
    2. Tsani, Stella, 2013. "Natural resources, governance and institutional quality: The role of resource funds," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 181-195.
    3. Konrad, Kai A., 2002. "Investment in the absence of property rights; the role of incumbency advantages," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(8), pages 1521-1537, September.
    4. Lane, Philip R. & Tornell, Aaron, 1998. "Why aren't savings rates in Latin America procyclical?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 185-199, October.
    5. Katerina Kalcheva & Nienke Oomes, 2007. "Diagnosing Dutch Disease; Does Russia Have the Symptoms?," IMF Working Papers 07/102, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Alberto Alesina & Filipe R. Campante & Guido Tabellini, 2008. "Why is Fiscal Policy Often Procyclical?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 6(5), pages 1006-1036, September.
    7. Michael Gavin & Roberto Perotti, 1997. "Fiscal Policy in Latin America," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997, Volume 12, pages 11-72 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Aaron Tornell, 1999. "Privatizing The Privatized," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1869, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    9. Saracoglu, Durdane Sirin, 2003. "On The Size And The Evolution Of The Informal Sector In Developing Countries: The Case Of Turkey," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22211, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    10. Ana Lamo & Javier J. Pérez & Ludger Schuknecht, 2013. "The cyclicality of consumption, wages and employment of the public sector in the euro area," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(12), pages 1551-1569, April.
    11. Ian W. McLean & Alan M. Taylor, 2001. "Australian Growth: A California Perspective," NBER Working Papers 8408, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Xavier Sala-i-Martin & Arvind Subramanian, 2013. "Addressing the Natural Resource Curse: An Illustration from Nigeria," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 22(4), pages 570-615, August.
    13. Carlos Scartascini & Ernesto H. Stein & Emmanuel Abuelafia & Sergio Berensztein & Miguel Braun & Luciano Di Gresia & Lee J. Alston & Marcus André Melo & Bernardo Mueller & Carlos Pereira & Mauricio Cá, 2009. "Who Decides the Budget? A Political Economy Analysis of the Budget Process in Latin America," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 87294 edited by Mark Hallerberg & Carlos Scartascini & Ernesto H. Stein, February.
    14. Robert Lavigne, 2006. "The Institutional and Political Determinants of Fiscal Adjustment," Staff Working Papers 06-1, Bank of Canada.
    15. Asea, Patrick K. & Lahiri, Amartya, 1999. "The precious bane," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 23(5-6), pages 823-849, April.
    16. Larrain B., Felipe & Tavares, José, 2007. "Can Openness Deter Corruption? The Role of Foreign Direct Investment," CEPR Discussion Papers 6488, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    17. Felipe Larraín & José Tavares, 2004. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Decrease Corruption?," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 41(123), pages 217-230.
    18. Tsani, Stella, 2015. "On the relationship between resource funds, governance and institutions: Evidence from quantile regression analysis," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 94-111.
    19. Fabrizio Carmignani & Abdur Chowdhury, 2007. "The Role of Primary Commodities in Economic Development: Sub-Saharan Africa Versus the Rest of the World," ECE Discussion Papers Series 2007_7, UNECE.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General


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