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The African Financial Development and Financial Inclusion Gaps

Author

Listed:
  • Allen, Franklin

    (University of Pennsylvania)

  • Carletti, Elena

    (Bocconi University)

  • Cull, Robert

    (World Bank)

  • Qian, Jun

    (Boston College)

  • Senbet, Lemma

    (University of Maryland)

  • Valenzuela, Patricio

    (University of Chile)

Abstract

This paper investigates the African financial development and financial inclusion gaps relative to other peer developing countries. Using a set of variables related to financial development and inclusion, we first estimate the gaps between African countries and other developing countries with similar degrees of economic development. Then, we explore the determinants of financial development and inclusion and find that population density appears to be considerably more important for financial development and inclusion in Africa than elsewhere. We then show evidence that a recent innovation in financial services, mobile banking, has helped to overcome infrastructural problems and improve financial access.

Suggested Citation

  • Allen, Franklin & Carletti, Elena & Cull, Robert & Qian, Jun & Senbet, Lemma & Valenzuela, Patricio, 2013. "The African Financial Development and Financial Inclusion Gaps," Working Papers 13-29, University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School, Weiss Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:upafin:13-29
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    File URL: http://fic.wharton.upenn.edu/fic/papers/13/13-29.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Isaac Mbiti & David N. Weil, 2015. "Mobile Banking: The Impact of M-Pesa in Kenya," NBER Chapters, in: African Successes, Volume III: Modernization and Development, pages 247-293, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Allen, Franklin & Carletti, Elena & Cull, Robert & Qian, Jun & Senbet, Lemma & Valenzuela, Patricio, 2012. "Improving Access to Banking: Evidence from Kenya," Working Papers 12-11, University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School, Weiss Center.
    3. Ross Levine & Norman Loayza & Thorsten Beck, 2002. "Financial Intermediation and Growth: Causality and Causes," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series, in: Leonardo Hernández & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (Se (ed.),Banking, Financial Integration, and International Crises, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 2, pages 031-084, Central Bank of Chile.
    4. Georg R. G. Clarke & Lixin Colin Xu & Heng-fu Zou, 2006. "Finance and Income Inequality: What Do the Data Tell Us?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 578-596, January.
    5. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 1997. "Africa's Growth Tragedy: Policies and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1203-1250.
    6. Shawn Cole & Anna Paulson & Gauri Kartini Shastry, 2014. "Smart Money? The Effect of Education on Financial Outcomes," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 27(7), pages 2022-2051.
    7. Brune, Lasse & Gine, Xavier & Goldberg, Jessica & Yang, Dean, 2011. "Commitments to save : a field experiment in rural Malawi," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5748, The World Bank.
    8. William F. Maloney & Daniel Lederman, 2008. "In search of the Missing Resource Curse," Economía Journal, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2008), pages 1-57, August.
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    JEL classification:

    • G02 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Behavioral Finance: Underlying Principles

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