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Natural Resource Abundance And Economic Growth Revisited

  • Jean-Philippe Stijns

    (University of California at Berkeley)

Data on energy and mineral reserves suggest that natural resource abundance has not been a significant structural determinant of economic growth between 1970 and 1989. The story behind the effect of natural resources on economic growth is a complex one that typical growth regressions do not capture well. Preliminary evidence suggests that natural resources may affect economic growth through both “positive” and “negative channels.” Potential reverse causality running from these “channels” to fuel and mineral reserves further complicates the analysis. I conjecture that, as economic historians suggest, the ability of a country to exploit its resource base depends critically on the nature of the learning process involved.

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File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/dev/papers/0103/0103001.pdf
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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Development and Comp Systems with number 0103001.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: 03 Apr 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0103001
Note: Type of Document - ZIPPED PDF; prepared on IBM PC ; pages: 40; figures: included
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://econwpa.repec.org

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