IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wii/wpaper/115.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Determinants of Specific Trade Concerns Raised on Technical Barriers to Trade

Author

Listed:
  • Mahdi Ghodsi

    () (The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw)

Abstract

Abstract This contribution evaluates determining factors of Specific Trade Concerns (STCs) raised on Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) notifications over the period 1995-2011. While multilateral and international agreements bind countries concerning the imposition of tariffs on imports, TBTs have become political instruments to conceal the true motivations of governments. The main legitimate reasons behind the imposition of TBTs are to increase environmental qualities and human health, or to improve market efficiencies. However, in addition to these reasons, governments are also in pursuit of protecting their domestic industries. Various effective factors of TBT STC notifications are considered in the econometric analysis using fixed effect Poisson (FEP) estimation as the main technique, and Poisson GMM as robustness specification. Results suggest that bilateral trade and tariffs are one of the forces of TBT STC notifications, acknowledging the protectionist behaviour of authorities. Moreover, countries with high quality of humans’ health-related environmental issues, and low environmental vitalities, are more likely to impose new TBTs. Overall, this study confirms the complex nature of TBT STCs affected by economic, technological, institutional, and health and environmental issues.

Suggested Citation

  • Mahdi Ghodsi, 2015. "Determinants of Specific Trade Concerns Raised on Technical Barriers to Trade," wiiw Working Papers 115, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
  • Handle: RePEc:wii:wpaper:115
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://wiiw.ac.at/determinants-of-specific-trade-concerns-raised-on-technical-barriers-to-trade-dlp-3663.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael O. Moore & Maurizio Zanardi, 2011. "Trade Liberalization and Antidumping: Is There a Substitution Effect?," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(4), pages 601-619, November.
    2. Thomas Prusa & Susan Skeath, 2002. "The economic and strategic motives for antidumping filings," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 138(3), pages 389-413, September.
    3. Whitney K. Newey & Kenneth D. West, 1994. "Automatic Lag Selection in Covariance Matrix Estimation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(4), pages 631-653.
    4. Kindleberger, Charles P, 1983. "Standards as Public, Collective and Private Goods," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(3), pages 377-396.
    5. Jan Van Hove, 2010. "Variety and quality in intra-European manufacturing trade: the impact of innovation and technological spillovers," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 43-59.
    6. Frank van Tongeren & John Beghin & Stéphane Marette, 2009. "A Cost-Benefit Framework for the Assessment of Non-Tariff Measures in Agro-Food Trade," OECD Food, Agriculture and Fisheries Papers 21, OECD Publishing.
    7. Hylke Vandenbussche & Maurizio Zanardi, 2008. "What explains the proliferation of antidumping laws?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 23, pages 93-138, January.
    8. Rosendorff, B Peter, 1996. "Voluntary Export Restraints, Antidumping Procedure, and Domestic Politics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 544-561, June.
    9. Otsuki, Tsunehiro & Wilson, John S. & Sewadeh, Mirvat, 2001. "Saving two in a billion: : quantifying the trade effect of European food safety standards on African exports," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 495-514, October.
    10. Mansfield, Edward D. & Milner, Helen V. & Rosendorff, B. Peter, 2000. "Free to Trade: Democracies, Autocracies, and International Trade," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 94(2), pages 305-321, June.
    11. Milner, Helen V. & Kubota, Keiko, 2005. "Why the Move to Free Trade? Democracy and Trade Policy in the Developing Countries," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 59(1), pages 107-143, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Claudius Gräbner & Philipp Heimberger & Jakob Kapeller & Bernhard Schütz, 2018. "Structural Change in Times of Increasing Openness," wiiw Working Papers 143, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    2. Mahdi Ghodsi, 2015. "Distinguishing Between Genuine and Non-Genuine Reasons for Imposing Technical Barriers to Trade: A Proposal Based on Cost-Benefit Analysis," wiiw Working Papers 117, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    3. Mahdi Ghodsi & Julia Grübler & Leon Podkaminer & Oliver Reiter, 2016. "Monthly Report No. 6/2016," wiiw Monthly Reports 2016-06, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    4. Philipp Heimberger, 2018. "The Dynamic Effects of Fiscal Consolidation Episodes on Income Inequality," wiiw Working Papers 147, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    5. Mahdi Ghodsi & Jan Jakub Michalek, 2016. "Technical Barriers To Trade Notifications And Dispute Settlement Within The Wto," Equilibrium. Quarterly Journal of Economics and Economic Policy, Institute of Economic Research, vol. 11(2), pages 219-249, June.
    6. Amat Adarov, 2018. "Financial Cycles Around the World," wiiw Working Papers 145, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    trade policy; technical barriers to trade;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F18 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Environment

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wii:wpaper:115. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Customer service). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/wiiwwat.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.