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The Russian-Ukrainian Political Divide

  • Amelie F. Constant
  • Martin Kahanec
  • Klaus F. Zimmermann

The Orange Revolution unveiled significant political and economic tensions between ethnic Russians and Ukrainians in Ukraine. Whether this divide was caused by purely ethnic differences or by ethnically segregated reform preferences is unknown. Analysis using unique micro data collected prior to the revolution finds that voting preferences for the forces of the forthcoming Orange Revolution were strongly driven by preferences for political and economic reforms but were also independently significantly affected by ethnicity, specifically, language and nationality. Russian speakers, as opposed to Ukrainian speakers, were significantly less likely to vote for the Orange Revolution, and nationality had similar effects.

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Article provided by M.E. Sharpe, Inc. in its journal Eastern European Economics.

Volume (Year): 49 (2011)
Issue (Month): 6 (November)
Pages: 97-109

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Handle: RePEc:mes:eaeuec:v:49:y:2011:i:6:p:97-109
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://mesharpe.metapress.com/link.asp?target=journal&id=106044

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  1. Fairlie, Robert W, 1999. "The Absence of the African-American Owned Business: An Analysis of the Dynamics of Self-Employment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(1), pages 80-108, January.
  2. Hartmut Lehmann & Norberto Pignatti & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2005. "The Incidence and Cost of Job Loss in the Ukrainian Labor Market," CERT Discussion Papers 0504, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.
  3. Kapstein, Ethan B. & Milanovic, Branko, 2000. "Dividing the spoils - pensions, privatization, and reform in Russia's transition," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2292, The World Bank.
  4. Constant, Amelie F. & Kahanec, Martin & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2006. "The Russian-Ukrainian Earnings Divide," IZA Discussion Papers 2330, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Gorodnichenko, Yuriy & Sabirianova Peter, Klara, 2005. "Returns to schooling in Russia and Ukraine: A semiparametric approach to cross-country comparative analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 324-350, June.
  6. Fairlie, Robert, 2014. "An Extension of the Blinder-Oaxaca Decomposition Technique to Logit and Probit Models," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt7j86n5q3, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  7. Fidrmuc, Jan, 2000. "Political support for reforms: Economics of voting in transition countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(8), pages 1491-1513, August.
  8. Brainerd, Elizabeth, 1998. "Winners and Losers in Russia's Economic Transition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1094-1116, December.
  9. Ganguli, Ina & Terrell, Katherine, 2005. "Institutions, Markets and Men's and Women's Wage Inequality: Evidence from Ukraine," IZA Discussion Papers 1724, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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