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The Russian-Ukrainian Political Divide

Author

Listed:
  • Amelie Constant
  • Martin Kahanec
  • Klaus F. Zimmermann

Abstract

The Orange Revolution unveiled significant political and economic tensions between ethnic Russians and Ukrainians in Ukraine. Whether this divide was caused by purely ethnic differences or by ethnically segregated reform preferences is unknown. Analysis using unique micro data collected prior to the revolution finds that voting preferences for the forces of the forthcoming Orange Revolution were strongly driven by preferences for political and economic reforms, but were also independently significantly affected by ethnicity; namely language and nationality. Russian speakers, as opposed to Ukrainian speakers, were significantly less likely to vote for the Orange Revolution, and nationality had similar effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Amelie Constant & Martin Kahanec & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2006. "The Russian-Ukrainian Political Divide," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 656, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp656
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Amelie F. Constant & Martin Kahanec & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2012. "The Russian–Ukrainian earnings divide," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 20(1), pages 1-35, January.
    6. Gorodnichenko, Yuriy & Sabirianova Peter, Klara, 2005. "Returns to schooling in Russia and Ukraine: A semiparametric approach to cross-country comparative analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 324-350, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hartmut Lehmann & Alexander Muravyev & Klaus Zimmermann, 2012. "The Ukrainian longitudinal monitoring survey: towards a better understanding of labor markets in transition," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-15, December.
    2. Brück, Tilman & Danzer, Alexander M. & Muravyev, Alexander & Weißhaar, Natalia, 2007. "Determinants of Poverty during Transition: Household Survey Evidence from Ukraine," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Göttingen 2007 33, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    3. Martin Kahanec & Anzelika Zaiceva, 2009. "Labor market outcomes of immigrants and non-citizens in the EU: An East-West comparison," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 30(1/2), pages 97-115, March.
    4. Muravyev, Alexander & Talavera, Oleksandr, 2016. "Can state language policies distort students’ demand for education?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 383-399.
    5. Brück, Tilman & Danzer, Alexander M. & Muravyev, Alexander & Weisshaar, Natalia, 2010. "Poverty during transition: Household survey evidence from Ukraine," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 123-145, June.
    6. Muravyev, Alexander & Talavera, Oleksandr, 2010. "Can State Language Policies Distort Students' Demand for Higher Education?," IZA Discussion Papers 5411, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Denisova-Schmidt, Elena & Huber, Martin, 2014. "Regional Differences in Perceived Corruption among Ukrainian Firms," Economics Working Paper Series 1407, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    8. MacDuffee Metzger, Megan & Bonneau, Richard & Nagler, Jonathan & Tucker, Joshua A., 2016. "Tweeting identity? Ukrainian, Russian, and #Euromaidan," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 16-40.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transformation; voting preferences; Ukraine; ethnicity; Orange Revolution;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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