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The Gender Imbalance in Participation in Canadian Universities (1977-2005)

Author

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  • Louis Christofides
  • Michael Hoy
  • Ling Yang

Abstract

More females than males have been attending Canadian universities over the past decade and this gender imbalance in university participation has been increasing. We use the Linear Probability and Logit models to investigate the determinants of attending university and explore the reasons for the increasing gender imbalance. We find that, in gender-specific equations, the values of the coefficients attached to variables and the values of the variables themselves are both important in explaining the rising level of the university participation rate for women and men. The important variables include a time trend to capture the evolving societal norms, the dynamic influence of parental education, the earnings premium for a university degree, tuition fees and real income. The increasing gap between the female and male participation rates (15 percentage points by 2005) can be accounted for equally by differences in the coefficients in female and male participation equations and the widening gap in the university premium for women and men.

Suggested Citation

  • Louis Christofides & Michael Hoy & Ling Yang, 2009. "The Gender Imbalance in Participation in Canadian Universities (1977-2005)," CESifo Working Paper Series 2791, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_2791
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Frenette, Marc & Zeman, Klarka, 2007. "Why Are Most University Students Women? Evidence Based on Academic Performance, Study Habits and Parental Influences," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2007303e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    2. Carlos Vieira & Isabel Vieira, 2009. "Student based funding in higher education systems with declining and uncertain enrolments: the Portuguese case," CEFAGE-UE Working Papers 2009_02, University of Evora, CEFAGE-UE (Portugal).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    university; participation; gender imbalance;

    JEL classification:

    • A20 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - General

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