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Gender gaps in early educational achievement

Author

Listed:
  • Deborah A. Cobb-Clark

    (The University of Melbourne
    Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families Over the Life Course)

  • Julie Moschion

    () (The University of Melbourne
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families Over the Life Course
    University of Nanterre)

Abstract

Abstract This paper analyzes the source of the gender gap in third-grade numeracy and reading. We adopt an Oaxaca-Blinder approach and decompose the gender gap in educational achievement into endowment and response components. Our estimation relies on unusually rich panel data from the Longitudinal Survey of Australian Children in which information on child development reported by parents and teachers is linked to each child’s results on a national, standardized achievement test. We find that girls in low- and middle-socio-economic-status (SES) families have an advantage in reading, while boys in high-SES families have an advantage in numeracy. Girls score higher on their third-grade reading tests in large part because they were more ready for school at age 4 and had better teacher-assessed literacy skills in kindergarten. Boys’ advantage in numeracy occurs because they achieve higher numeracy test scores than girls with the same education-related characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Julie Moschion, 2017. "Gender gaps in early educational achievement," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(4), pages 1093-1134, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:30:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s00148-017-0638-z
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-017-0638-z
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:izalbr:v:7:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1186_s40172-018-0062-y is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Huong Thu Le & Ha Trong Nguyen, 2018. "The evolution of the gender test score gap through seventh grade: new insights from Australia using unconditional quantile regression and decomposition," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 7(1), pages 1-42, December.
    3. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:62:y:2018:i:c:p:230-253 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Rodríguez-Planas, Núria & Nollenberger, Natalia, 2018. "Let the girls learn! It is not only about math … it's about gender social norms," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 230-253.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender gaps; Educational achievement; Education; Australia;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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