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Nature’s experiment? Handedness and early childhood development

Author

Listed:
  • David Johnston
  • Michael Nicholls
  • Manisha Shah
  • Michael Shields

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Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • David Johnston & Michael Nicholls & Manisha Shah & Michael Shields, 2009. "Nature’s experiment? Handedness and early childhood development," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 46(2), pages 281-301, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:46:y:2009:i:2:p:281-301
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.0.0053
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1353/dem.0.0053
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christopher S. Ruebeck & Joseph E. Harrington, Jr & Robert Moffitt, 1997. "Handedness and Earnings," Economics Working Paper Archive 533, The Johns Hopkins University,Department of Economics, revised Jun 2004.
    2. Christopher J. Ruhm, 2004. "Parental Employment and Child Cognitive Development," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(1).
    3. Matthew Gray & Diana Smart, 2009. "Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children: A Valuable New Data Source for Economists," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 42(3), pages 367-376.
    4. Johnston, David W. & Shah, Manisha & Shields, Michael A., 2007. "Handedness, Time Use and Early Childhood Development," IZA Discussion Papers 2752, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Kevin Denny & Vincent O’ Sullivan, 2007. "The Economic Consequences of Being Left-Handed: Some Sinister Results," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(2).
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Julie Moschion, 2017. "Gender gaps in early educational achievement," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(4), pages 1093-1134, October.
    2. Aydogan Ulker, 2016. "Body size at birth, physical development and cognitive outcomes in early childhood: evidence from the Longitudinal Survey of Australian Children," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(2), pages 142-166, April.
    3. Paul Frijters & David Johnston & Manisha Shah & Michael Shields, 2013. "Intrahousehold Resource Allocation: Do Parents Reduce or Reinforce Child Ability Gaps?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(6), pages 2187-2208, December.
    4. Da Silva, Sergio & Moreira, Bruno & Da Costa Jr, Newton, 2014. "2D:4D Digit Ratio Predicts Delay of Gratification in Preschoolers," MPRA Paper 60570, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Guven, Cahit & Lee, Wang-Sheng, 2015. "Height, aging and cognitive abilities across Europe," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 16-29.
    6. Paul Frijters & David W. Johnston & Manisha Shah & Michael A. Shields, 2009. "To Work or Not to Work? Child Development and Maternal Labor Supply," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(3), pages 97-110, July.
    7. Sergio Da Silva & Bruno Moreira & Newton Da Costa Jr, 2015. "Handedness and digit ratio predict overconfidence in cognitive and motor skill tasks in a sample of preschoolers," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(2), pages 1087-1097.
    8. Tony Beatton & Paul Frijters, 2012. "Unhappy Young Australians: a domain approach to explain life satisfaction change in children," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 289, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.

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