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Human capital and genetic diversity

Author

Listed:
  • Tiago Neves Sequeira

    () (Universidade da Beira Interior)

  • Marcelo Santos

    (Universidade da Beira Interior)

  • Alexandra Ferreira-Lopes

    (Instituto Universitário de Lisboa
    CEFAGE-UBI)

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between human capital and the ancestral genetic diversity of populations. A simple model highlights a new channel through which genetic diversity can affect development: human capital. Additionally, empirical evidence of an unconditional hump-shaped relationship between genetic diversity and human capital is documented. This relationship decreases statistical significance when other deeply rooted determinants of human capital are taken into account. However, we found some significantly positive (linear) effects of genetic diversity. Thus, if there is a relationship between genetic diversity and human capital, this relationship tends to be positive: more genetic diversity is beneficial to human capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Tiago Neves Sequeira & Marcelo Santos & Alexandra Ferreira-Lopes, 2019. "Human capital and genetic diversity," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 9(3), pages 311-330, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eurase:v:9:y:2019:i:3:d:10.1007_s40822-018-0112-6
    DOI: 10.1007/s40822-018-0112-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Simplice A. Asongu & Oasis Kodila†Tedika, 2017. "Is Poverty in the African DNA (Gene)?," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 85(4), pages 533-552, December.
    2. Oasis Kodila-Tedika & Simplice A. Asongu, 2016. "Genetic distance and cognitive human capital: a cross-national investigation," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 33-51, April.
    3. Phiri, Andrew, 2020. "Genetic diversity, disease prevalence and the coronavirus pandemic," MPRA Paper 101175, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human capital; Genetic diversity; Determinants of development; Determinants of human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • N10 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • N30 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O50 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - General
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics

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