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Genetic Distance and Cognitive Human Capital: A Cross-National Investigation

Author

Listed:
  • Oasis Kodila-Tedika

    () (Université de Kinshasa Département d’Eco)

  • Simplice Asongu

    () (Yaoundé/Cameroun)

Abstract

This paper explores the determinants of intelligence by focusing on the role played by barriers to the diffusion of competence and human capital. The results based on cross-sectional data from 167 countries consisting of 1996-2009 averages suggest that, genetic distance to global frontiers has a negative relationship with human capital. Countries that are genetically far from leading nations tend to have lower levels of human capital with the negative correlation from the USA frontier higher relative to the UK frontier. The sign is consistent with the relationship of genetic diversity and robust to the control of macroeconomic, geographical, institutional and influential variables. Policy implications are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Oasis Kodila-Tedika & Simplice Asongu, 2015. "Genetic Distance and Cognitive Human Capital: A Cross-National Investigation," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 15/012, African Governance and Development Institute..
  • Handle: RePEc:agd:wpaper:15/012
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    File URL: http://www.afridev.org/RePEc/agd/agd-wpaper/Genetic-Distance-and-Cognitive-Human-Capital.A-Cross-National-Investigation.pdf
    File Function: Revised version, 2013
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Simplice A. Asongu & Oasis Kodila†Tedika, 2017. "Is Poverty in the African DNA (Gene)?," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 85(4), pages 533-552, December.
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    12. Oasis Kodila-Tedika & Remy Bolito-Losembe, 2014. "Poverty and Intelligence: Evidence using Quantile Regression," Economic Research Guardian, Weissberg Publishing, vol. 4(1), pages 25-32, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Simplice A. Asongu & Oasis Kodila-Tedika, 2018. "“This One Is 400 Libyan Dinars, This One Is 500”: Insights from Cognitive Human Capital and Slave Trade," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 291-306, April.
    2. Simplice A. Asongu & Oasis Kodila-Tedika, 2018. "“This One Is 400 Libyan Dinars, This One Is 500”: Insights from Cognitive Human Capital and Slave Trade," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 291-306, April.
    3. Oasis Kodila†Tedika & Simplice A. Asongu, 2018. "Does Intelligence Affect Economic Diversification?," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 19(1), pages 74-93, February.
    4. Simplice A. Asongu & Oasis Kodila-Tedika, 2018. "“This one is 400 Libyan dinars, this one is 500†: Insights from Cognitive Human Capital and Slave Trade," AFEA Working Papers 18/014, African Finance and Economic Association (AFEA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Intelligence; Human Capital; Genetic distance;

    JEL classification:

    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • O50 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - General
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • N7 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services

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