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Too Far to Go On? Distance to School and University Participation

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  • Marc Frenette

Abstract

This study assesses the role of distance to school in the probability of attending university shortly after high school. Students who grow up near a university may avoid moving and added living costs by commuting from home to attend the local university. The distance between the homes of high school students and the nearest university is calculated by combining household survey data and a database of Canadian university postal codes. Students living 'out of commuting distance' are far less likely to attend university than students living 'within commuting distance'. Students from lower-income families are particularly disadvantaged by distance.

Suggested Citation

  • Marc Frenette, 2006. "Too Far to Go On? Distance to School and University Participation," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 31-58.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:14:y:2006:i:1:p:31-58
    DOI: 10.1080/09645290500481865
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Zhao, John & Lipps, Garth & Corak, Miles, 2003. "Family Income and Participation in Post-secondary Education," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2003210e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
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    Keywords

    University access; distance to school;

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