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Heterogenity in the Intergenerational Transmission of Educational Attainment: Evidence from Switzerland on Natives and Second


  • Bauer, Philipp C.
  • Riphahn, Regina T.


This study applies rich data from the 2000 Swiss census to investigate the patterns of intergenerational education transmission for natives and second generation immigrants. The level of secondary schooling attained by youth aged 17 is related to their parents' educational outcomes using data on the entire Swiss population. Based on economic theories of child educational attainment we derive hypotheses regarding the patterns in intergenerational education transmission. The data yields substantial heterogeneity in intergenerational transmission across population groups. Only a small share of this heterogeneity is explained by the predictions of economic theory.

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  • Bauer, Philipp C. & Riphahn, Regina T., 2005. "Heterogenity in the Intergenerational Transmission of Educational Attainment: Evidence from Switzerland on Natives and Second," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 38, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:cegedp:38

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    intergenerational transmission; educational attainment; second generation immigrants;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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